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MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Discussion of forensic issues related to all types of mobile phones and underlying technologies (GSM, GPRS, UMTS/3G, HSDPA, LTE, Bluetooth etc.)
Subforums: Mobile Telephone Case Law
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MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 11:16 pm

The BBC website identifies a report by MPs that presents findings that many see as the chaotic forensic landscape in Britain today - www.trewmte.blogspot.c...osion.html
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trewmte
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Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 5:55 am

- trewmte
The BBC website identifies a report by MPs that presents findings that many see as the chaotic forensic landscape in Britain today - www.trewmte.blogspot.c...osion.html


If I may, the BBC article is about general "forensics" and not particularly about Digital forensics, particularly, from what I can understand the FSS activities in the "digital" field:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ce_Service
web.archive.org/web/20.../services/
were just one among the many. Confused

jaclaz
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jaclaz
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Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:34 am

Forensics generally and the demise of the FSS are covered in the article; you right on that Jaclaz.

I am only in a position though to argue the corner of the area in which I work. I didn't have anything to say on other forensic areas as I would be in difficulty in discussing DNA, pathology etc etc.

The article doesn't, though, expressly or otherwise exclude computer forensics or mobile forensics etc nor did the article exempt/preclude them from having been unaffected by the current state of the forensics generally.
_________________
Institute for Digital Forensics (IDF) - LinkedIn
Mobile Telephone Examination Board (MTEB) - LinkedIn
Mobile Telephone Evidence & Forensics trewmte.blogspot.com
ForensicMobex now MTEB Linkedin Subgroup 

trewmte
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 12:43 pm

- trewmte

I am only in a position though to argue the corner of the area in which I work. I didn't have anything to say on other forensic areas as I would be in difficulty in discussing DNA, pathology etc etc.

Sure, I understand that. Smile

- trewmte

The article doesn't, though, expressly or otherwise exclude computer forensics or mobile forensics etc nor did the article exempt/preclude them from having been unaffected by the current state of the forensics generally.

Of course, but what I am completely missing is the "connection" or "the point" with (need for) academic (or non academic) qualifications.

Call me a "hairy reasoner" as much as you want, but it is not like the people that worked at the FSS were vapourized by some death rays, if (fictional numbers) the FSS employed a total of 1,000 scientists/examiners/qualified personnel, of which (say) 100 dedicated to "digital forensics", at the time of the shutting down of the FSS it has probably happened the same things that happen everywhere and in any field whenever a largish firm/institution closes down, the most qualified/capable/expert/etc. (let's assume 75 to 90%) were soon employed by competitors (in this case most likely local Police forces or private firms or universities/research labs) or started their own activities, those less qualified ( the remaining 10 to 25%) changed their job into something similar (or very different) but this should not have altered significantly the market (in the sense of volume of cases that can be globally taken into exam) nor the actual opening (or closing) of the job marketplace.

It seems to me like the whole issue, as always, revolves about money (and in this sense it can be extended to many more fields that forensics or just "digital forensics").

The FSS was closed substantially because it costed too much.

The current preoccupations of the MP's are about Police spending (bit by bit, and peripherally, i.e. without centralized control) too much (and while doing this, being less effective).

In the meantime the Universities have put together courses on the wave of the popularity that forensics got through the media (direct CSI effect), courses that seemingly do very little to actually "deliver" qualified graduates (at least in the specific "digital forensics" field).

But we have seen on the other thread about the rates of pay and on several other threads that there are very little chances for a freshly graduated chap to get a "first time job" in the field, let alone decently payed.

All or most the job vacancies posted on the forum seem like being related to middle to vastly experienced professionals, which should be - AFAICU - a "finite" number.

The new and inexperienced (no matter if properly qualified at the UNI of not) seem to me like having only a few choices:
  • find a job as "generic IT"
  • do some underpaid internship as long as they(or their families) can afford it
  • become part of what you call "push button forensics" still underpaid and with little chances of ever "evolving"

So it seems to me that while there may be a lack of "appropriate qualification" for the "newcomers" there is anyway not (or not enough) "qualified work/jobs" for them.

This sounds (from the quoted BBC article) caused by a "general contraction of the field" (which I read as "less money available"), and this is independent from the actual availability of qualified personnel.

jaclaz
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jaclaz
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Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 2:25 pm

I read the article.

I call this "the airline magazine syndrome". Mr. Green

Your boss flies back from her favorite vacation spot. During the return flight she reads an article from a "magazine" about a small company in a very distant land with totally different business model, product and services. This fascinating specimen of organization of mom and pop implemented the magic technology beans. These magic technology beans not just increased network speed on their 300baud modem, did their banking, but separated laundry and made a lovely casserole for dinner.

The article is highly questionable, mostly fluff, no references, lots of conjectures, and jumping to conclusions.

This of course does not bother the boss, and promptly requires the implementation of said magic technology beans.

This BBC article is such. Maybe not magic technology beans, but such broad brush that it makes no difference if discussing psychic support hotline forensics or digital forensics - they are forensics, ergo must be a mess.

Worse, by the time this gets picked up across the pond, the whole thing will be just a vague mess. Politicians with technology IQ of 4 will be salivating to show the constituents how savvy they are, and harumph on the horrible state of forensics - including digital forensics.

Now, I go and make a nice casserole for dinner. Neutral  

jhup
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 6:32 pm

hear, hear Smile  

Adam10541
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: MPs warn of chaotic forensic landscape

Post Posted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:57 pm

I have no problem with any of the comments above and can well see from an outsiders point of view why the article may seem speculative. However, here the Britain the article represents a bubble of thought as to what is going on, but at this time it is well received as reflecting some observations.

Prior to the BBC article Professor Peter Sommer made a presentation to Parliament in January of this year raising observations about forensic landscape and the problematical situation with quick changing technology, attempts to introduce a one-size-fits-all standards model and costs implications

www.publications.parli...10vw03.htm

Peter's is just one of many views, like my views, see problems and proffer solutions.

Mobile forensics qualifications are unavoidable and thus inescapable where SSE (as per my article) is concerned and distinguishes between the subject matter experienced versus the jack of all trades, master of none.

I am curious why people wouldn't want mobile forensic qualifications, because it starts to pose the question why then have computer forensic qualifications(?), as an example. Moreover, we could go further and maybe have blood sampling, DNA and fingerprint forensics downgraded to a consultancy services, too(?).
_________________
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trewmte
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