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Page 389

Secret tracking codes in laser printers cracked

Friday, October 21, 2005 (09:02:59)
The pages that are printed by your colour laser printer may include tiny dots, almost invisible to the naked eye. The dots form a code that can be read by the US Secret Service, ostensibly to track down counterfeiters. Now, for the first time, the code has been cracked. The Secret Service has admitted before that the tracking information is part of a deal struck with selected colour laser printer manufacturers – including Xerox, Canon and many others. If a colour laser printer is used to forge a document and agents get sight of the document, the codes can be read. However, the full nature of the private information encoded in each document was not previously known...

More (Out-Law.com)

Cybercrooks lure citizens into international crime

Thursday, October 20, 2005 (11:39:56)
Consumer-level financial fraud has been around since thieves first thought to filch blank checks from mailboxes. The Internet has taken it to a new level, not yet fully understood by the general public. By many measures, 2005 is shaping up as a watershed year for e-commerce — and cybercrime...

More (USATODAY.com)

Cyber crime and the Indian Police force

Wednesday, October 19, 2005 (08:34:29)
I am often quizzed by friends on how savvy the Indian Police are in handling cyber crime. Although it is a few years since I left the force, I have been closely following trends of cyber investigation and Court decisions. I am generally pleased with what I have seen or heard. A few victim organisations have actually told me that they have been happy with the style of approach of cyber crime cells in receiving complaints and disposing of them in the manner prescribed by law. This satisfactory situation is the outcome of a heavy emphasis on training by the police leadership and the involvement of private industry and bodies such as the Nasscom in providing the necessary inputs...

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Computer forensics rises up the legal agenda

Tuesday, October 18, 2005 (10:18:55)
The legal profession is responding to the increasing importance of digital evidence in legal cases by extending its professional development training to include computer forensics. In the first of a series of presentations to 23 Essex Street, information forensics specialists Andy Clark and Nick Spenceley, directors of Inforenz, spoke about The Hidden Life of Documents. They demonstrated how rigorous forensic investigation can reveal unexpected information about computer files such as how, when and by whom they are created. They were also able to show how such data has provided key evidence for both prosecution and defence in a wide variety of criminal cases. The Inforenz talk was followed by a presentation by barristers from 23 Essex Street about the legal issues surrounding the use of digital evidence.

Specialist police units tackle computer crime

Sunday, October 16, 2005 (11:45:59)
In April 2001, the government established a National Hi-Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) to combat the growth of computer crime and solve serious crime. Some 43 local Hi-Tech Crime Units (HTCUs) were also set up to tackle similar offences at a regional level. But according to detective chief superintendent Sharon Lemon, head of the NHTCU, more needs to be done to educate the 140,000 police officers in England and Wales about how technology can provide digital clues to solve crimes...

More (computing)