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Page 413

Backlog mires US crime lab

Friday, June 10, 2005 (05:49:37)
SBI agent Eric R. Hicks spent last week scouring more than half a million files on one computer hard drive for evidence against a man accused of sending p**n to kids. Because he always works two cases at once, Hicks also was searching 100,000 files in a CP case. As the agency's only computer forensic technician, Hicks' work is in such high demand that he still has a backlog of about 50 cases -- a year's work...

More (The News & Observer)

New Article: An Investigation Into Computer Forensic Tools

Thursday, June 09, 2005 (17:09:03)
An Investigation into Computer Forensic Tools

by K.K. Arthur & H.S. Venter
Information and Computer Security Architectures (ICSA) Research Group
University of Pretoria

Rise in UK public sector PC misuse

Thursday, June 09, 2005 (07:20:05)
Computer fraud and abuse is on the rise in the public sector, a report by the public watchdog, the Audit Commission, has found. The number of computer fraud cases has doubled, up from 8% of cases in 2001 to 16% in 2004...

More (BBC)

Course boosts computer forensics capability in Hong Kong

Wednesday, June 08, 2005 (14:00:34)
To enhance officers' computer forensics capability, the Hong Kong Police organised a two-week "Computer Forensics Certification Course" last month that 18 computer forensics examiners attended. The first part covered file system level analysis which underpins all computer forensics theories. The second part focused on "Encase Intermediate Analysis & Reporting", forensics software developed by Guidance Software of the US...

More (news.gov.hk)

PGP use ruled relevant in Minnesota

Wednesday, June 08, 2005 (04:16:06)
A Minnesota appeal court has ruled that a trial judge was within his rights to allow police evidence about the presence of an encryption program on a defendant's computer to be admitted in a child abuse case. The ruling came as the Minnesota State Court of Appeals rejected an appeal by David Levie against his conviction. The case, although never put before a jury, could establish the precendent that the use of an encryption programme might be admitted as evidence of criminal intent, as least in Minnesota...

More (Register)