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Page 415

Red Cliff's Keith Jones and Curtis Rose Author ''Real Digital Forensics''

Friday, May 06, 2005 (04:44:50)
Keith Jones and Curtis Rose have harnessed their technical acumen to write their latest book entitled, "Real Digital Forensics." The book's over 500 pages cover the methodology for the collection and analysis of computer forensic data; the approach for compiling toolkits used at the scene of the crime; and the ways to conduct deep forensic analysis. The authors have decided to publish the book with a DVD containing realistic evidence collected from several fictitious scenarios for the sole purpose of learning the computer forensics tradecraft...

More (Press Release)

New Article: Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (12:11:13)

Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

by Joan E. Feldman, President
Computer Forensics Inc.â„¢

Criminal IT: The crime you can still get away with

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (06:40:22)
In the field of computer crime, there is one glaring problem: the law. Until relatively recently, there was no law to criminalise what might be recognised as obvious 'mischiefs' performed against computers; there was no legal framework to make hacking, viruses, denial of service or the theft of intellectual property positively illegal. That these were unwelcome activities was obvious but finding a law within which such actions could be prosecuted and punished was simply not possible...

More (Silicon.com)

Experts in distributed computing see potential for computer forensics

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 (05:52:10)
Golden Richard III, a professor of computer science at New Orleans University and a digital forensics expert, has been experimenting with using distributed computing to recover lost computer files. By harnessing the number-crunching power of several computers to work on a single chore, he has been able to crack cases that once took 45 minutes in only eight seconds. Mr. Richard said that distributed computing is especially time-saving when searching a hard drive for a single name or word. It also helps computer forensic specialists find photos that have been cropped or resized. Distributed computing in the service of solving steganographic codes—images concealed in other images—is also very helpful, said Mr. Richard...

More (Red Herring)

Cyberchase: Experts discuss benefits, risks

Tuesday, May 03, 2005 (05:47:45)
Like Hansel and Gretel [Brill explained] people leave crumbs as they wander cyberspace or work on their computer desktops. Following those crumbs, forensic scientists at Kroll have been able to trace Saddam Hussein's stolen billions; understand the implosion of Enron; and track down terrorists. Thieves can also find those crumbs, which account for the vast number of identity-theft cases in recent months, where hundreds of thousands of identities have been snatched. "We leave behind a trail of crumbs, whether we like it or not," Brill said. "It is an issue that we cannot afford to ignore as individuals, corporations or a society..."

More (The Advocate)