±Partners and Sponsors

±Your Account


Nickname
Password


Forgotten password/username?


Membership:
New Today: 0
New Yesterday: 13
Overall: 26756
Visitors: 64

±Follow Forensic Focus

Join our LinkedIn group

Subscribe to news

Subscribe to forums

Subscribe to blog

Subscribe to tweets

Page 416

UK Police forced to turn away e-crime victims

Thursday, April 14, 2005 (08:33:17)
UK Police are having to turn down requests to investigate computer crime from businesses due to a lack of resources, the National Hi-Tech Crime Unit said last week. Mick Deats, deputy head of the unit, said the complex, time-consuming nature of investigations meant the unit could not investigate every case reported. Deats, responding to demands from business groups for greater funding for high-tech crime, as reported in last week's Computer Weekly, said more resources were needed...

More (Computer Crime Research Center)

Ibas buys computer forensics rival Vogon

Wednesday, April 13, 2005 (05:40:37)
Data recovery and computer forensics firm Ibas announced plans Monday to buy its main European competitor, UK-based Vogon International. The deal is based on an "earn-out" model, which specifies a minimum price of £4m ($7.5m) and a maximum of £9m ($17m). Vogon will continue as a separate firm until the end of the year, with the integration with Norway-based Ibas kicking off on 1 January 2006. Vogon is privately-owned, and all the shareholders in the UK company have accepted the deal. The acquisition is conditional on a financial due diligence report...

More (Register)

The two-edged sword: Legal computer forensics and open source

Tuesday, April 12, 2005 (05:19:27)
Ryan Purita of Totally Connected Security is one of the leading computer forensic experts in private practice in Canada. A GNU/Linux enthusiast, Purita often prefers open source tools. However, he frequently uses proprietary ones as well. The proprietary tools, he explains, are "pretty," with better developed GUIs that are easier for clients to understand. Moreover, the precedence for accepting their evidence in court is well established although, increasingly, their open source equivalents are not far behind...

More (IT Manager's Journal)

New, smarter generation of Internet crooks

Monday, April 11, 2005 (07:04:58)
"I work in the fraud dept. for a well known US company, and have access to hundreds of CCs (credit card numbers) on a daily basis. All I'm looking for is an easy way to make some money and stay anonymous ..." Late last year, someone known as "Elric" posted this message on a Web site for hackers and credit card thieves. Cyber crime investigators say deals like the one proposed in Elric's posting are common on a number of similar underground Web sites...

More (SFGate.com)

Police surf in search of criminals

Sunday, April 10, 2005 (21:34:41)
Police and prosecutors are awaiting the results of a forensics shakedown of the computer used at work by Richard Salewicz of Noblesville, who was arrested April 1 for soliciting sex over the Internet from an undercover officer. Noblesville (US) Police Department Detective Mike Widner, who netted Salewicz while posing as a 13-year-old girl during a sting operation, said so far no new charges have been filed against Salewicz...

More (The Noblesville Daily Times)