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Page 420

New versions of TSK and Autopsy now available

Saturday, April 09, 2005 (06:33:18)
New versions of both tools are available. Both have minor bug fixes from the new 2.00 TSK features. There is one bug that impacts split image users, so everyone should upgrade TSK. Autopsy also has a new feature that shows the thumbnail of a picture when it is selected in File Mode (patch by Guy Voncken).

TSK 2.01
MD5: e84ed011e7b999abc08174e239ecb474
http://www.sleuthkit.org/sleuthkit/

Autopsy 2.05
MD5: adfbb31ce665cc8efdbf8711bbd97483
http://www.sleuthkit.org/autopsy/

To catch a (digital) thief?

Friday, April 08, 2005 (08:04:50)
Those investigating crime have long understood the value of evidence. In its most literal sense, evidence is "that which demonstrates that a fact is so". By acquiring evidence we build a picture of what happened, how it came to be and, hopefully, who did it. The digital world is no different to the physical world in that every event leaves a trace. This digital evidence can be gathered and pieced together to help develop our understanding of the what, how and who of an incident. Over time, this process has come to be referred to as Computer Forensics...

More (SC Magazine)

Web Browser Forensics, Part 1

Wednesday, April 06, 2005 (12:12:22)
Electronic evidence has often shaped the outcome of high-profile civil law suits and criminal investigations ranging from theft of intellectual property and insider trading that violates SEC regulations to proving employee misconduct resulting in termination of employment under unfavorable circumstances. Critical electronic evidence is often found in the suspect's web browsing history in the form of received emails, sites visited and attempted Internet searches. This two-part article presents the techniques and tools commonly used by computer forensics experts to uncover such evidence, through a fictitious investigation that closely mimics real-world scenarios...

More (SecurityFocus)

Hi-tech crime costs UK plc £2.4bn

Wednesday, April 06, 2005 (07:14:53)
According to a survey for the National Hi-Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU), almost nine out of 10 firms suffered some kind of IT-based crime last year. A major risk was action taken by disgruntled employees, often working with crooks on the outside. Two-thirds of the firms surveyed said they feared that business would be disrupted, not only by the crime but also by the investigation...

More (BBC)

Step-by-Step Incident Response

Tuesday, April 05, 2005 (11:35:53)
When a critical enterprise server is breached, a well thought-out incident response plan will help you contain damage, speed up service restoration, and collect forensic information. If you have reason to believe that a system has been compromised, either by an Intrusion Detection alert or by suspicious activity, the first thing to do is isolate the system before it can do damage. It is most likely dangerous to log into the system and try to do a normal shutdown—the shutdown procedure could have been booby-trapped to cause the system to self-destruct. Likewise, rebooting the system is risky – again, a booby trap could have been inserted. Even logging into the system is unsafe, as trusted programs could have been replaced with malicious Trojans. In fact, a compromised system is never what it seems—a skilled attacker will hide his malware and create the illusion that all is as it should be, when the reality is that the machine is actually a zombie. A compromised machine cannot be trusted at all...

More (Network Computing)