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Page 421

Crime time for Chinese net users

Monday, May 09, 2005 (06:52:17)
Around 20% of the world's hijacked computers sending out spam, attacking websites and hosting unsavoury material are in China, says a report. The figures, from security firm Ciphertrust, come amid spiralling rates of internet use in China...

More (BBC)

Police culture

Saturday, May 07, 2005 (07:05:39)
If you ask Chris Budge, the police are no worse - and may even be a lot better - than any other organisation when it comes to looking at p**n at work. Budge should know. The computer forensic consultant runs eCrime, a company called in by businesses to audit their computers for offensive and objectionable material or to check them out for fraud...

More (The New Zealand Herald)

Red Cliff's Keith Jones and Curtis Rose Author ''Real Digital Forensics''

Friday, May 06, 2005 (04:44:50)
Keith Jones and Curtis Rose have harnessed their technical acumen to write their latest book entitled, "Real Digital Forensics." The book's over 500 pages cover the methodology for the collection and analysis of computer forensic data; the approach for compiling toolkits used at the scene of the crime; and the ways to conduct deep forensic analysis. The authors have decided to publish the book with a DVD containing realistic evidence collected from several fictitious scenarios for the sole purpose of learning the computer forensics tradecraft...

More (Press Release)

New Article: Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (12:11:13)

Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

by Joan E. Feldman, President
Computer Forensics Inc.â„¢

Criminal IT: The crime you can still get away with

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (06:40:22)
In the field of computer crime, there is one glaring problem: the law. Until relatively recently, there was no law to criminalise what might be recognised as obvious 'mischiefs' performed against computers; there was no legal framework to make hacking, viruses, denial of service or the theft of intellectual property positively illegal. That these were unwelcome activities was obvious but finding a law within which such actions could be prosecuted and punished was simply not possible...

More (Silicon.com)