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Page 427

Cyberchase: Experts discuss benefits, risks

Tuesday, May 03, 2005 (05:47:45)
Like Hansel and Gretel [Brill explained] people leave crumbs as they wander cyberspace or work on their computer desktops. Following those crumbs, forensic scientists at Kroll have been able to trace Saddam Hussein's stolen billions; understand the implosion of Enron; and track down terrorists. Thieves can also find those crumbs, which account for the vast number of identity-theft cases in recent months, where hundreds of thousands of identities have been snatched. "We leave behind a trail of crumbs, whether we like it or not," Brill said. "It is an issue that we cannot afford to ignore as individuals, corporations or a society..."

More (The Advocate)

Computer aces sleuth for FBI

Monday, May 02, 2005 (07:56:12)
Sept. 11 turned Sung-Ki Lim and Sang Jun from geeks to G-men. Well, they're still geeks, but instead of pursuing an MBA or traveling far and wide as systems analysts, the two men are putting their technical skills to work for the FBI. As computer crime increases and as terrorists increasingly use digital technology to plot their activities, law enforcement finds that it needs to recruit from the same fields that high-tech headhunters have been plowing for years...

More (SFGate.com)

New Article: Job hunting advice for UK computer forensics professionals

Friday, April 29, 2005 (10:53:13)
A superb new article by David Sullivan entitled "Job hunting advice for UK computer forensics professionals" is now online at

http://www.forensicfocus.com/computer-forensics-jobs-uk

I am sure our UK members will find it a very worthwhile read!

Jamie

Fraud propels demand for computer forensics training

Friday, April 29, 2005 (06:46:36)
In the 'if you can't beat 'em, join 'em stakes', computer-based crime is driving more and more IT professionals to study the skills and tools needed to unravel and reveal the inner workings of cyber fraudsters. The general upsurge in computer skills in the population is reflected equally amongst criminals and malcontents and law enforcement agencies frequently confiscate computers to search for evidence of alleged misdeeds. In the knowledge race, computer forensics has become a priority and, since 1999 has propelled the growth in demand for training in this sector by 600 percent, according to Paul Hughes, managing director of Brisbane-based Frontier Security Solutions...

More (Computerworld)

Browser History: What Happened?

Thursday, April 28, 2005 (06:42:26)
Occasionally, you might need to trace a user's Web-browsing path. Manual forensic analysis, which involves digging through cookie files, the browser's cache, and browser history data, isn't easy. For a good rundown on forensic analysis of browser activity, you should consider reading "Web Browser Forensics, Part 1," by Keith J. Jones and Rohyt Belani of Red Cliff Consulting. The article, published on the SecurityFocus Web site, offers a brief usage overview of some very useful tools: in particular, Pasco, Internet Explorer History Viewer, Web Historian, and Forensic Toolkit...

More (WindowsITPro)