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Page 430

Real-life CSI vastly different than what's on TV

Thursday, February 03, 2005 (06:45:14)
Crime scene investigators for the Warner Robins Police Department (US) have a lot of the crime-fighting gadgets that actors do on the popular CSI television shows. And there are other similarities between what real-life CSI investigators do and what's portrayed on TV. But there also are some key differences. Lt. John Lanneau, who heads the CSI division for the Warner Robins Police Department, said his team, like TV, employs the use of expensive tools to gather evidence - he has $10,000 worth of computer forensics equipment and a specialized CSI investigator trained to find evidence hidden in a computer hard drive...

More (Macon Telegraph)

Computer based crime linked to international crime syndicates

Wednesday, February 02, 2005 (12:25:07)
Andrew Clark, director and co-founder of Inforenz, spends much of his time as an expert forensics witness for the UK government, banks, and MNCs. He notes that there are signs that computer-based crimes are becoming the province of international organised crime syndicates. He cautions if that spiralled out of control, the effect of computer based crime could seriously damage the critical infrastructure and trading situation of nation states.

More (Network Computing Asia)

Digital evidence: Today's fingerprints

Tuesday, February 01, 2005 (10:08:08)
Police and prosecutors are fashioning a new weapon in their arsenal against criminals: digital evidence. The sight of hard drives, Internet files and e-mails as courtroom evidence is increasingly common. "Digital evidence is becoming a feature of most criminal cases," said Susan Brenner, professor of law and technology at the University of Dayton School of Law, in an e-mail response for this article. "Everything is moving in this direction." Digital evidence may play a significant role in the trial of pop superstar Michael Jackson on charges of child molestation...

More (CNN)

DOD seized 60TB in search for Iraq battle plan leak

Monday, January 31, 2005 (07:43:17)
The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) seized hundreds of computers and around 60T bytes of data as part of an investigation into how details of the U.S. invasion plan for Operation Iraqi Freedom were leaked to The New York Times, a DOD official said. The investigation ended in 2003 without finding the source of the leak. However, it has prompted changes within the department, which is developing new software tools and investigative strategies for computer crime cases that involve large amounts of data, said Lt. Col Ken Zatyko, director of the DOD's Computer Forensics Laboratory.

More (Computerworld)

UK tech police: Cash-strapped and ineffective

Thursday, January 27, 2005 (06:42:53)
A senior UK high-tech crime buster has warned that his investigations are being severely hampered by a lack of money and has said funding could still be pared down further to the point that police units such as his become untenable. Speaking at the Computer and Internet Crime Conference in London, DC Tony Noble from Surrey Police Computer Crime Unit said many reported incidents of cybercrime, such as hacking or data theft from within a company, don't get investigated due to "an accountancy culture" in the police force.

More (Silicon)