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Page 435

EnCase Forensic Version 5 now available

Monday, March 28, 2005 (16:17:18)
V5 resources from Guidance available at

http://www.guidancesoftware.com/v4tov5.shtm

Expert rejects Lundy evidence

Monday, March 28, 2005 (08:34:39)
A computer forensics expert who has spent up to 400 hours examining evidence in the Mark Lundy murder case says he has ruled out police claims that Lundy manipulated a computer clock to give himself an alibi. The Crown at Lundy's trial in 2002 claimed that after murdering his wife Christine and daughter Amber in their Palmerston North home, Lundy tampered with the clock to make it appear the computer was shut down at 10.52pm - when he was 150km away in Petone...

More (Stuff)

Can computers survive cross-examination?

Saturday, March 26, 2005 (06:13:06)
Between my fingers typing these words and the Word application which records them there is a huge range of different programs, not all of which I know intimately. If even a simple document such as this is potentially affected by unknown sequences of instructions, then what of a more important document relevant to a criminal prosecution? How sure can we be that the evidence of guilt contained on a computer should be relied upon?

More (ZDNet)

UK MP to raise bill to boost computer crime laws

Friday, March 25, 2005 (05:54:05)
Derek Wyatt, chairman of the All Party Internet Group, is to raise a 10 minute rule bill in the Commons next month calling for the Computer Misuse Act to be strengthened. The move follows a campaign by Computer Weekly, businesses and IT security professionals to increase sentencing for offenders and tighten the act's provisions against denial of service attacks.

From (ComputerWeekly.com)

Super Resolution: Making the invisible visible

Thursday, March 24, 2005 (09:09:20)
Intel is developing a technology that promises to uncover hidden information in digital images and videos and create output files of significantly higher resolution and quality. "Super Resolution" (SR) consumes enormous computing resources, but is on track to reduce the bandwidth required to transmit video files and automatically enhance digital pictures sometime in the future...

More (Tom's Hardware Guide)