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Page 436

DOD cyber sleuths swap secrets in Florida

Friday, January 14, 2005 (12:20:04)
The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) is making changes to streamline its response to online threats across the various branches of the military, and deal with a steady stream of new online woes, from hacking attempts to child pornography and threats posed by powerful portable storage devices such as iPods, according to senior DOD officials. The DOD blocked and traced 60,000 intrusion attempts on its unclassified networks in 2004, and wrestles with spam, illicit pornography and other common Internet threats. If left to fester the threats could hamper the massive defense agency, which relies on global, unclassified networks for critical business operations, said Lieutenant General Harry Raduege, director of the Defense Information Systems Agency.

Raduege was speaking at the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Conference in Palm Harbor, Florida, an annual gathering of some of the government's top IT, computer forensic and research and development talent.

More (Standard)

Hard drives, hard facts

Monday, January 10, 2005 (09:16:36)
In Montgomery County's (US) computer forensic department, Det. Ray Kuter's workload has grown steadily during the past four years. Kuter heads the forensic laboratory. Computer forensic analysis has come of age in recent years and is now routinely performed to gather evidence on suspects in all types of criminal cases. In the past two years, Kuter's forensic exams showed a defendant had used instant messaging to intimidate a witness set to testify in her trial, uncovered another woman's fraudulent online purchases of prescription drugs, and revealed some online habits of a man convicted of murdering an East Norriton woman...

More (The Times Herald)

Digital lifesaver

Monday, January 10, 2005 (09:12:27)
Problems encountered in daily life often spawn new business concepts. But few problems are as severe as those encountered by Brady Essman, the 36-year- old president, CEO and founder of digitalmedix, an Englewood-based data retrieval and computer forensics firm. Essman's story began with a crashed hard drive that resulted in critical sales information being lost. Essman subsequently lost his job with a storage technology company. A divorce followed. And while there may not be a direct line between a dead hard drive and a wrecked marriage, Essman's world came crashing down in the spring of 1998.

More (RockyMountainNews.com)

FBI Opens New Bay Area Forensics Lab

Saturday, January 08, 2005 (17:02:18)
They are the types of evidence now linking virtually every case the FBI investigates -- high-tech devices used by criminals. Now the FBI is sharing its high-tech tools with Bay Area law enforcement by opening a new forensics lab.

More (abc)

Begin a forensics investigation with WinHex

Thursday, January 06, 2005 (11:39:24)
The time may come when you need to examine a hard drive either because you need to recover some lost data or because you suspect an employee of a violation. Whether you intend to use your findings in court, for employee discipline, or just for your own information, using a good forensics tool and recognized forensics techniques will help you both recover your data and preserve its value as evidence. A tool I recommend is WinHex...

More (TechRepublic)