±Forensic Focus Partners

±Your Account


Nickname
Password


Forgotten password/username?


Membership:
New Today: 4
New Yesterday: 6
Overall: 27389
Visitors: 74

±Follow Forensic Focus

Join our LinkedIn group

Subscribe to news

Subscribe to forums

Subscribe to blog

Subscribe to tweets

Page 437

Criminal IT: What you can do to help the fight against cybercrime

Thursday, February 24, 2005 (10:38:55)
Neil Barrett gives some insight into how IT workers can help law enforcement and expert witnesses like himself when prosecuting cybercriminals. My day job is a rather unusual one; I'm a computer expert witness, principally in criminal prosecutions and primarily for the police. I help to identify, preserve, analyse and - perhaps most importantly - present computer-derived evidence. My job is to make sure the jury - usually complete computer novices - have the best possible chance of understanding and appreciating the nature of the technology and arguments involved. It's a fascinating, challenging, frustrating and deeply rewarding occupation... More (Silicon)

Fraud Prevention on Top of Agenda for Corporate Boards in 2005

Monday, February 21, 2005 (07:50:36)
Computer forensics have played a lead role in fraud investigations for some time. In the coming year, look for the emergence of real-time, diagnostic software that will enable corporations to detect “red flags” of potential accounting fraud or other types of financial misconduct.

More (Sarbanes-Oxley)

Feds square off with organized cyber crime

Friday, February 18, 2005 (11:05:18)
At the RSA Conference on Thursday Ronald Plesco, counsel to the National Cyber-Forensics and Training Alliance, a computer forensics organization established by the FBI and private industry, pointed to the trend in recent years of spammers building networks of compromised computers to launder their fraudulent e-mail offerings. Tim Rosenberg, a research professor at the George Washington University, warned of "multinational groups of hackers backed by organized crime" and showing the sophistication of prohibition-era mobsters...

More (Security Focus)

Investigators uncover dismal data disposal

Thursday, February 17, 2005 (07:22:33)
An investigation into the disposal of computer equipment has uncovered psychological reports on school-children, confidential company data and even details of an illicit affair on hard drives that should have been wiped clean. Universities, schools and global businesses are routinely breaking the Data Protection Act by disposing of computers without removing personal data, researchers found. The Computer Forensics team at the University of Glamorgan examined over 100 hard drives at the behest of investigative journalist, Peter Warren. Some of the drives were bought from eBay, others from computer fairs and traders. Only two contained no recoverable data at all, and one of those was brand new...

More (The Register)

USA's Sixth Cyber Lab Opened in Silicon Valley

Tuesday, February 15, 2005 (08:37:24)
The FBI calls them Regional Computer Forensics Laboratories, or RCFLs. Their specialty? The cyber equivalent of dusting for fingerprints: finding evidence of criminal and terrorist activity on PCs, laptops, cell phones, digital cameras, MP3 players, PDAs, DVD recorders, and other electronic devices. Evidence that generates leads, solves cases, and helps establish guilt or innocence in a court of law. The concept was born in the 1990s, with the spike in criminal cases involving digital evidence. "Why don't we pool our expertise and establish regional labs that can handle everyone's needs for cyber forensics?" the law enforcement community asked. Congress helped supply the funds, and the first RCFL was launched in 1999...

More (LinuxElectrons)