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Page 441

Detective, check that hard drive

Monday, November 08, 2004 (13:45:26)
Noble Dean will graduate from Purdue University for the second time in December with his master’s degree in science and technology. His degree has taught the 31-year-old to look at the world in an entirely different light.

“This,” he said, pointing to his cell phone, “is increasingly becoming a piece of digital evidence that has to be investigated.”

Computer forensics research, which looks for evidence about crimes in electronic media, is a hot topic at Purdue’s School of Technology.

More (FortWayne.com)

E-mail Discovery Primer for Legal Professionals

Tuesday, November 02, 2004 (17:46:49)
A Non-Technical Primer - Taught by Warren Kruse and Steven Branigan.

From the comfort of your home or office anytime 24 hours/day, 7 days/week.

What do you need to know when making or receiving an Electronic Discovery request pertaining to e-mail? Where are you likely to find e-mail of value and how do you get it? Deleted e-mail does not mean it is gone, find out why.

Cost $95.00 (can be viewed by one or many at a time). For more
information call 732-544-8080 or e-mail info@computer-forensic.com

Purdue professors train police officers to use e-mail in solving crimes

Thursday, October 28, 2004 (09:27:02)
Today at the Holiday Inn Select in Indianapolis, Purdue professors and staff will team up with the National White Collar Crime Center to teach 110 Indiana police officers about e-mail forensics. The training session is part two of a previous session that taught officers about examining hard drives on computers, said Marcus Rogers, associate professor of computer technology and one of the trainers of the class. The session will focus on using e-mail as evidence to help law enforcement solve crimes faster and more efficiently.

More (The Exponent)

Easy to defeat computer forensics

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (08:24:30)
Breaking into computer networks and remaining untraceable after the breach has been detected is apparently easier than anyone would like it to be, said The Grugq, a Britain-based hacker. The Grugq, who refused to reveal his true identity, said remaining undetectable, even from computer forensics experts, is achievable with freely available tools that can be downloaded from the Internet. “The scary thing is that it’s very easy to do. Law enforcement officers rely on expensive commercial tools rather than knowledge,” he said.

More (The Star)

Data recovery, Australian style

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (08:20:59)
A couple of Australian coppers have used their forensic expertise to create a software company that has chalked up success in Europe and Japan. And by Christmas they will be showing the Yanks how as well. The two "dumped-data detectives" once helped authorities with the One.Tel, HIH and Rene Rivkin investigations, and are now helping businesses find lost data and files.

More (Australian IT)