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Page 446

Method Provides Double Computer Crime-Solving Evidence

Wednesday, November 17, 2004 (14:54:57)
Like an episode of "CSI: Computers," a UF researcher has developed a technique that gives digital detectives twice the forensic evidence they now have to catch all kinds of hackers, from curious teenagers to disgruntled employees to agents of foreign governments.

Writing in the current issue of the International Journal of Digital Evidence, UF doctoral student Mark Foster proposes a new and improved method of computer crime solving, called “process forensics.”

“If a guy walks into a bank and robs it, leaving footprints behind or his fingerprints on the counter, the forensic analyst would come in and find those traces of what happened,” said Foster. In the same way, process forensics merges two existing types of digital evidence – intrusion-detection and checkpointing technology – to give an investigator the most possible information to crack a case, said Foster, a computer science and engineering student conducting the research for his dissertation with UF professor of computer science Joseph Wilson, who co-wrote the paper.

More (Newswise)

Final version of NIST's "Guidelines on PDA Forensics" complete

Tuesday, November 16, 2004 (14:53:30)
Special Publication 800-72, entitled Guidelines on PDA Forensics, was developed to help organizations evolve appropriate policies and procedures for dealing with PDA forensics and to provide forensic specialists with a background on the technology, tools, and principles involved. The intended audience ranges from response team members handling a computer security incident, to organizational security officials investigating an employee-related situation, to forensic examiners involved in criminal investigations.

More (IWS)

The lighter side of data recovery

Sunday, November 14, 2004 (08:30:02)
An executive who froze his broken hard disk thinking it would be fixed has topped a list of the weirdest computer mishaps.

Although computer malfunctions remain the most common cause of file loss, data recovery experts say human behaviour still is to blame in many cases.

More (BBC)

New opensource computer forensics tool - Vital Data FoRK based on PSK

Tuesday, November 09, 2004 (14:16:26)
The team at Vital Data have finished beta testing their FoRK CD and have uploaded version 1.0.0 for all members to download. It is available at forensicIT.com.au in the General Utilities - GNU / Linux - Downloads section.

It is based on the Knoppix 3.6 LiveCD, with some customisations and additions. Bugs identified during the testing were only minor, such as identification of hard drives transposing makes with model numbers, etc. These have all been corrected. We encourage everyone to download the CD, as it is an extremely useful tool to have, and we would appreciate all the testing and feedback we can get.

Stopping Computer Crime

Tuesday, November 09, 2004 (11:19:31)
Stopping computer crime requires two basic things: You need to let criminals know it won't be tolerated by reporting and prosecuting, and tell the world what these crimes are and how folks can avoid being a victim. It's not enough to know you're under attack, or that you think you're in compliance with relevant laws—you must collect the evidence supporting your assumptions.

More (MCPmag.com)