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Digital Forensics, Computer Forensics, eDiscovery

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Forensic Focus Forum Round-Up

Tuesday, August 19, 2014 (08:48:45)
Welcome to this round-up of recent posts to the Forensic Focus forums.

A forum member unearths a very old hard drive; how can it be analysed?

Is it possible to retrieve IP information by logging into a Hotmail account?

Forum members discuss the reasons for using commercial vs. open source software.

An MSc student is interested in forensics professionals’ opinions about the key issues investigators face in cloud forensics.

Forum members give their recommendations for rebuilding RAID arrays.

How can an active file and a deleted file have completely identical timestamps?

Forum members discuss how to get a physical image of a Galaxy S3 handset using XRY.

Which are the best part-time training courses for forensics practitioners in the UK? Add your recommendations in the forum.

Interview with Emlyn Butterfield, Course Leader, Leeds Metropolitan University

Thursday, August 14, 2014 (14:23:02)
Emlyn, you’re currently Course Leader in Computer Forensics, Security & Ethical Hacking at Leeds Metropolitan University. Could you tell us more about the role and how you entered academia?

As course leader it is my responsibility to maintain a healthy set of courses. By healthy I mean happy students, staff, good student intakes each year and courses that are fit for purpose. I, along with my team, try to ensure that the courses are designed and refreshed in line with industry: to allow us to do this we utilise industry experts as advisors, providing ideas and critical feedback on the teaching material, assessments and methods – through this we try to ensure that students receive a varied and relevant learning experience.

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Arnim Eijkhoudt, Lecturer in Digital Forensics, University of Applied Sciences

Tuesday, August 05, 2014 (18:37:17)
Arnim, please tell us about your role as a lecturer in digital forensics, and how you first became interested in the field.

I've been fascinated with 'tinkering' with computers from a young age: figuring out why things (don't) work, reverse-engineering, reconstructing what happened and so on. Therefore, it was natural for me to turn to the fields of Forensics and Security after I studied Informatics and became a lecturer. Before 2007 I was already incorporating Computer Security-related topics into my lectures and classes where possible. From 2007 to 2013, the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and the University of Amsterdam have offered a joint Minor in Forensic Intelligence & Security (MINFIS)...

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The Complete Workflow of Forensic Image and Video Analysis

Tuesday, July 29, 2014 (11:00:10)
In this article we’ll describe the complete workflow for image and video forensics. In fact, just like computer forensics in not only dumb copying and looking at files, forensic video analysis is broad and complex and there are many steps that are commonly missed and rarely taken into account. It can be quite overwhelming if we think of all the tasks related to analysis.

As a forensic video analyst, it is important to be aware of all the possible steps needed for a really complete analysis. This way, you can stay organized and minimize the possibility of skipping or missing steps. Also, if you do have to go to court, you have an outline that serves as the basis of your presentation.

It is important to remember that the job of a forensic video analyst does not start and end with viewing and enhancing a video...

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Investigating the Dark Web

Monday, July 28, 2014 (15:58:38)
The recent rise in the number of people who suspect they may be being tracked on the internet, whether by government agencies, advertisers or nefarious groups, has led to increased interest in anonymising services such as TOR.

TOR, or The Onion Router, conceals a user’s identity and network activity from others who wish to uncover information about them. It has been used by journalists and individuals working under strict regimes, and by whistleblowers and others who need to be able to disseminate information both safely and anonymously.

Of course, TOR also has its applications in the criminal world, and it is perhaps for this that it is most well known. Silk Road, one of its largest sites, found itself under press scrutiny when the FBI shut it down in October 2013...

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