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Page 241

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Computer forensics making a difference

Thursday, October 27, 2005 (13:39:14)
For the last four years, David Usery, 47, has been a man the public doesn’t see — a pivotal person behind thousands of criminal case investigations from the 9th judicial District Attorney’s Office and New Mexico State Police as well as local law enforcement. Usery is the Information Systems Manager for the DA’s office. He is a computer forensics expert and prepares computer-generated maps, images and animation for courtroom presentations. The evidence Usery gathers from hard drives is damning, “I’ve never had to testify in court, they (defendants) usually plead,” he said...

More (Portales News-Tribune)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (628 reads)

Digital fingerprint cracks the case

Tuesday, October 25, 2005 (20:01:41)
Last month, when Australian Federal Court Judge Murray Wilcox ruled that Kazaa is illegally authorising copyright infringement, he put Australia on the world map of landmark intellectual property cases - related cases against Kazaa in the US had previously failed. But Wilcox's finding has also put Australia on the map for another reason. Wilcox relied on crucial digital evidence from forensic computer specialists. In a situation where there was no smoking gun, these specialists were able to build a solid case on purely digital evidence...

More (The Age)

Microsoft, Nigeria Join Forces Against Cybercrime

Monday, October 24, 2005 (12:48:05)
Microsoft Latest News about Microsoft is lending its I.T. expertise to the government of Nigeria in a joint effort to combat e-mail fraud and other cybercrimes in the African nation...

More (Top Tech News)

Secret tracking codes in laser printers cracked

Friday, October 21, 2005 (09:02:59)
The pages that are printed by your colour laser printer may include tiny dots, almost invisible to the naked eye. The dots form a code that can be read by the US Secret Service, ostensibly to track down counterfeiters. Now, for the first time, the code has been cracked. The Secret Service has admitted before that the tracking information is part of a deal struck with selected colour laser printer manufacturers – including Xerox, Canon and many others. If a colour laser printer is used to forge a document and agents get sight of the document, the codes can be read. However, the full nature of the private information encoded in each document was not previously known...

More (Out-Law.com)

Cybercrooks lure citizens into international crime

Thursday, October 20, 2005 (11:39:56)
Consumer-level financial fraud has been around since thieves first thought to filch blank checks from mailboxes. The Internet has taken it to a new level, not yet fully understood by the general public. By many measures, 2005 is shaping up as a watershed year for e-commerce — and cybercrime...

More (USATODAY.com)