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Can computers survive cross-examination?

Saturday, March 26, 2005 (06:13:06)
Between my fingers typing these words and the Word application which records them there is a huge range of different programs, not all of which I know intimately. If even a simple document such as this is potentially affected by unknown sequences of instructions, then what of a more important document relevant to a criminal prosecution? How sure can we be that the evidence of guilt contained on a computer should be relied upon?

More (ZDNet)

UK MP to raise bill to boost computer crime laws

Friday, March 25, 2005 (05:54:05)
Derek Wyatt, chairman of the All Party Internet Group, is to raise a 10 minute rule bill in the Commons next month calling for the Computer Misuse Act to be strengthened. The move follows a campaign by Computer Weekly, businesses and IT security professionals to increase sentencing for offenders and tighten the act's provisions against denial of service attacks.

From (ComputerWeekly.com)

Super Resolution: Making the invisible visible

Thursday, March 24, 2005 (09:09:20)
Intel is developing a technology that promises to uncover hidden information in digital images and videos and create output files of significantly higher resolution and quality. "Super Resolution" (SR) consumes enormous computing resources, but is on track to reduce the bandwidth required to transmit video files and automatically enhance digital pictures sometime in the future...

More (Tom's Hardware Guide)

Judge in Jackson trial: Computer images inadmissible

Thursday, March 24, 2005 (05:37:30)
Computers seized from Michael Jackson's bedroom and containing stored images of naked women from adult Web sites are not admissible at the singer's child-molestation trial, Superior Court Judge Rodney Melville ruled Wednesday. Melville said he barred the materials because it was unclear if anyone actually viewed or downloaded the images that were stored on four computer hard drives. In arguing to bar the material, defense attorney Robert Sanger said that the origins of the images were murky. For example, Sanger said they could have been sent as an unsolicited e-mail before landing in the computers' "cache" file. Sanger added that it was unclear if Jackson himself had used the computer. "The issue of who accessed the material is totally unresolved," he said...

More (SantaMariaTimes.com)

Kroll Ontrack Honors "Thought Leaders" in Electronic Discovery

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 (05:11:13)
Kroll Ontrack(R) has honored top legal professionals with its third annual Electronic Evidence Thought Leadership Awards. Award recipients include law firms, litigators, practice support professionals and scholars who have shown excellence and leadership in the field of electronic discovery.

More (BusinessWire)

Crime fighters solve crimes by examining cell phones

Tuesday, March 22, 2005 (13:33:10)
Modern detectives are now using cell phone forensics to capture more and more criminals. Forensics, the science of preserving, extracting and examining data, has long been confined to computers. Now, with the help of cell phone seizure kits like the one from Paraben, detectives can easily extract important information from all types of cell phones...

More (Tom's Hardware Guide)

Speak up to beat cybercriminals

Tuesday, March 22, 2005 (12:43:33)
The police have long complained that organisations that are the victims of computer crime are reluctant to come forward for fear an investigation will cripple their business as the police seize servers and PCs as evidence. On the other hand, businesses have repeatedly complained that the police lack the skills and resources to properly investigate cybercrime...

More (ComputerWeekly.com)

New paper: Computer Forensics – A Business Tool

Tuesday, March 22, 2005 (08:24:48)
A new paper, "Computer Forensics – A Business Tool", by Andy Fox of Audax Digital Forensics is now online and can be read at

http://www.forensicfocus.com/computer-forensics-business-tool

FBI's new computer forensics lab already has full load

Tuesday, March 22, 2005 (06:36:30)
Blue lights flashed inside the Menlo Park office suite, a signal to the "propeller heads'' -- highly trained forensic computer examiners -- that fellow FBI agents had arrived with another cyber-mystery for them to solve. This one was buried somewhere in the pair of Compaq hard drives they had seized in January from Victor Conte Jr. The agents handed over the drives wrapped in opaque pink plastic bags and filled out the case files with what they were seeking: any evidence that the Balco mastermind illegally leaked the grand jury testimony of Barry Bonds and others to the media...

More (TwinCities.com)

Experts evolve new techniques to solve cyber crime

Monday, March 21, 2005 (05:28:44)
Electronic crime detection experts are working with police and forensic detectives in a Scottish university to establish new techniques to detect cyber crime, especially CP. "Anybody using a computer leaves a trail, and it's very hard to cover that trail completely," says Ian Ferguson of Strathclyde University's Computer and Information Science department. "We call it 'leaving footprints in the digital flowerbed' and the detective work comes in finding the individual signatures - like phrases, structures of sentences, habits of using capitals in certain places. "In e-mail stalking cases these begin to form a pattern, and that pattern is invariably repeated somewhere...

More (newkerala)