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Digital highwaymen

Thursday, May 12, 2005 (05:48:10)
Technology hit the headlines for the wrong reasons again last week, as a gang of British software pirates who characterised themselves as latter-day Robin Hoods found themselves in jail. The convictions underlined the perception that cybercrime is on the up, a feeling exacerbated by a recent attempted £220-million (about R2,5-million) hacking raid on the Sumitomo Mitsui bank in London, which garnered Mission Impossible headlines. But despite the Hollywood-style imagery generated by such crimes, and the fact that these offences are on the increase, not all of it is as hi-tech as it might appear...

More (Media & Guardian online)

New Article: Learning from Other's Mistakes - Issues Arising from E-Discovery

Tuesday, May 10, 2005 (15:44:01)
A new article by Setec Investigations entitled "Learning from Other's Mistakes: Issues Arising from Electronic Discovery" is now online.

The article can be read here.

Federation Warns Company Directors They Are at Risk from Their IT Department

Tuesday, May 10, 2005 (07:45:18)
The Federation Against Software Theft today warns UK company directors that they risk being branded ‘software thieves’ because of the actions of their employees, including those in the IT department. This comes in the wake of The Federation’s launch of Operation Tracker...which uses evidence gathered by computer forensics experts to apply for court orders and obtain the relevant user information from ISPs...

More (SecurityPark.net)

Crime time for Chinese net users

Monday, May 09, 2005 (06:52:17)
Around 20% of the world's hijacked computers sending out spam, attacking websites and hosting unsavoury material are in China, says a report. The figures, from security firm Ciphertrust, come amid spiralling rates of internet use in China...

More (BBC)

Police culture

Saturday, May 07, 2005 (07:05:39)
If you ask Chris Budge, the police are no worse - and may even be a lot better - than any other organisation when it comes to looking at p**n at work. Budge should know. The computer forensic consultant runs eCrime, a company called in by businesses to audit their computers for offensive and objectionable material or to check them out for fraud...

More (The New Zealand Herald)

Red Cliff's Keith Jones and Curtis Rose Author ''Real Digital Forensics''

Friday, May 06, 2005 (04:44:50)
Keith Jones and Curtis Rose have harnessed their technical acumen to write their latest book entitled, "Real Digital Forensics." The book's over 500 pages cover the methodology for the collection and analysis of computer forensic data; the approach for compiling toolkits used at the scene of the crime; and the ways to conduct deep forensic analysis. The authors have decided to publish the book with a DVD containing realistic evidence collected from several fictitious scenarios for the sole purpose of learning the computer forensics tradecraft...

More (Press Release)

New Article: Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (12:11:13)

Collecting And Preserving Electronic Media

by Joan E. Feldman, President
Computer Forensics Inc.â„¢

Criminal IT: The crime you can still get away with

Thursday, May 05, 2005 (06:40:22)
In the field of computer crime, there is one glaring problem: the law. Until relatively recently, there was no law to criminalise what might be recognised as obvious 'mischiefs' performed against computers; there was no legal framework to make hacking, viruses, denial of service or the theft of intellectual property positively illegal. That these were unwelcome activities was obvious but finding a law within which such actions could be prosecuted and punished was simply not possible...

More (Silicon.com)

Experts in distributed computing see potential for computer forensics

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 (05:52:10)
Golden Richard III, a professor of computer science at New Orleans University and a digital forensics expert, has been experimenting with using distributed computing to recover lost computer files. By harnessing the number-crunching power of several computers to work on a single chore, he has been able to crack cases that once took 45 minutes in only eight seconds. Mr. Richard said that distributed computing is especially time-saving when searching a hard drive for a single name or word. It also helps computer forensic specialists find photos that have been cropped or resized. Distributed computing in the service of solving steganographic codes—images concealed in other images—is also very helpful, said Mr. Richard...

More (Red Herring)

Cyberchase: Experts discuss benefits, risks

Tuesday, May 03, 2005 (05:47:45)
Like Hansel and Gretel [Brill explained] people leave crumbs as they wander cyberspace or work on their computer desktops. Following those crumbs, forensic scientists at Kroll have been able to trace Saddam Hussein's stolen billions; understand the implosion of Enron; and track down terrorists. Thieves can also find those crumbs, which account for the vast number of identity-theft cases in recent months, where hundreds of thousands of identities have been snatched. "We leave behind a trail of crumbs, whether we like it or not," Brill said. "It is an issue that we cannot afford to ignore as individuals, corporations or a society..."

More (The Advocate)