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Computer aces sleuth for FBI

Monday, May 02, 2005 (07:56:12)
Sept. 11 turned Sung-Ki Lim and Sang Jun from geeks to G-men. Well, they're still geeks, but instead of pursuing an MBA or traveling far and wide as systems analysts, the two men are putting their technical skills to work for the FBI. As computer crime increases and as terrorists increasingly use digital technology to plot their activities, law enforcement finds that it needs to recruit from the same fields that high-tech headhunters have been plowing for years...

More (SFGate.com)

New Article: Job hunting advice for UK computer forensics professionals

Friday, April 29, 2005 (10:53:13)
A superb new article by David Sullivan entitled "Job hunting advice for UK computer forensics professionals" is now online at

http://www.forensicfocus.com/computer-forensics-jobs-uk

I am sure our UK members will find it a very worthwhile read!

Jamie

Fraud propels demand for computer forensics training

Friday, April 29, 2005 (06:46:36)
In the 'if you can't beat 'em, join 'em stakes', computer-based crime is driving more and more IT professionals to study the skills and tools needed to unravel and reveal the inner workings of cyber fraudsters. The general upsurge in computer skills in the population is reflected equally amongst criminals and malcontents and law enforcement agencies frequently confiscate computers to search for evidence of alleged misdeeds. In the knowledge race, computer forensics has become a priority and, since 1999 has propelled the growth in demand for training in this sector by 600 percent, according to Paul Hughes, managing director of Brisbane-based Frontier Security Solutions...

More (Computerworld)

Browser History: What Happened?

Thursday, April 28, 2005 (06:42:26)
Occasionally, you might need to trace a user's Web-browsing path. Manual forensic analysis, which involves digging through cookie files, the browser's cache, and browser history data, isn't easy. For a good rundown on forensic analysis of browser activity, you should consider reading "Web Browser Forensics, Part 1," by Keith J. Jones and Rohyt Belani of Red Cliff Consulting. The article, published on the SecurityFocus Web site, offers a brief usage overview of some very useful tools: in particular, Pasco, Internet Explorer History Viewer, Web Historian, and Forensic Toolkit...

More (WindowsITPro)

New Article: Mining the Protected Storage Area

Wednesday, April 27, 2005 (12:40:25)
A new article by Andy Dodd entitled "Using areas of the Microsoft Windows registry to mine data for use in Forensic Computing" has been added to the computer forensics papers and articles section.

We are always happy to consider new additions to this section. Submissions or proposals should be sent through the contact form.

Skeletons on your hard drive

Wednesday, April 27, 2005 (10:58:58)
There are a number of options for cleansing the drives of unwanted computers, from special wiping software to destruction services to manufacturers' recycling programs. But what many PC owners don't realize, experts say, is that these methods are often not enough. Two weeks ago, the National Association for Information Destruction announced that it could not endorse the use of wiping applications alone for deleting data from hard drives. Bob Johnson, executive director at NAID, said the data-destruction industry group would like to be able to recommend the tools, but that tests had left reason to doubt the wiping products...

More (News.com)

Task force cracks down in California

Wednesday, April 27, 2005 (07:16:13)
Computer crimes are like viruses - they infect many and quickly, mutating as technology grows ever more complex. In the Solano area, though, there's an antidote - "NC3TF." In layman's terms, that's the Northern California Computer Crimes Task Force, a Napa-based criminal justice outfit with a Redding bureau that celebrates its fifth birthday in June...

More (The Reporter)

It's no secret -- they're here to help (with computer forensics)

Tuesday, April 26, 2005 (08:37:06)
Local US law enforcement agencies that lack resources and technology to extract and analyze the data on seized computers and electronic devices now can turn to the U.S. Secret Service for help. Government technicians will analyze computers, cell phones and PDAs and generate easy-to-read forensic reports for free, said Jeff Eisenbeiser, the special agent in charge of the Secret Service's Pittsburgh office...

More (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

UK police tackle mounting internet caseload

Saturday, April 23, 2005 (07:42:03)
British police are refining their crackdown on internet p----philes as a swelling caseload of offences involving the downloading of images of child abuse pushes computer forensics teams to their limits. According to police sources over 300 people a month are still being referred to special police units. This is despite the success of 'Operation Ore' which led to the names of 7,272 suspects being passed to forces in the UK after US police broke up a p----phile website operation...

More (The Register)

Data Recovery: What to do when back-ups break down

Friday, April 22, 2005 (06:39:31)
Businesses are so reliant on their data that only the very naive do not make regular back-ups. And if lack of business sense prevents some companies from running sensible housekeeping routines, new and stringent legislation now requires businesses to keep data available for the purpose of audit trails and data protection compliance. Traditionally, back-up and data archives were the preserve of the finance director, who needed a record of data to complete year-end figures for the Inland Revenue. However, post-Enron and WorldCom, corporate governance has extended to keeping an audit trail of all transactions for regulated industries, and to maintaining records of business-critical documents for others...

More (ComputerWeekly.com)