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2015

Interviews

2015


2015

Helge Janicke, Head of Software Technology Research Laboratory, De Montfort University

Tuesday December 22, 2015 (13:12:15)   (707 Reads)
Helge Janicke
Helge, you're Head of the Software Technology Research Laboratory at De Montfort University. Tell us a bit about your role - what does your day-to-day routine look like?

It is busy. Part of my role is looking at developing strategic partnerships with other research organisations and industries to make sure that our research has impact and is creating a maximum effect. Then there are the day to day activities of running a lab with twenty researchers and over 60 PhD students and making sure that there is sufficient funding to sustain them. A great thing is actually still getting a little time to do some research, working on exciting projects as well as staying in touch with our Master students, teaching them or supervising their projects.   more ...

2015

Joe Giordano, Professor of Practice, Utica College

Thursday November 19, 2015 (10:37:54)   (2108 Reads)
Joe Giordano
Joe, can you tell us something about your background and why you decided to teach digital forensics?

I am a Professor of Practice at Utica College (Utica, New York) and also serve as the director of two master’s degree programs – Master of Science in Cybersecurity and Master of Professional Studies in Cyber Policy and Risk Analysis. Currently, most of my teaching is relegated to basic and foundational courses on cybersecurity and information security. We’ve recently hired some outstanding experts to teach our computer forensics courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The people we now have teaching computer forensics come from backgrounds in law enforcement, the military, national intelligence and business. We have professors who hold most every major forensics certification that you can think of. It’s a faculty to be proud of.   more ...

2015

Julia Pakhomova, Chief Developer, ReclaiMe

Monday November 09, 2015 (08:49:40)   (1308 Reads)
Julia Pakhomova
Julia, you're Chief Developer at ReclaiMe. Could you tell our readers a bit about your role, and what an average day looks like?

Actually, ReclaiMe is not that big a company and the chief developer position is not limited to developing algorithms for data recovery and analysis. The scope of my responsibility also includes planning development strategies; that is, what area of forensic data recovery we will study next. Also, I am responsible for the technical support and based on this I suggest what to improve or add to our flagship product – ReclaiMe Pro.   more ...

2015

Heather Mahalik, Senior Instructor, SANS

Tuesday November 03, 2015 (13:41:56)   (1306 Reads)
Heather Mahalik
Heather, please tell us about your role as a Senior Instructor at SANS as well as a Forensic Scientist - what does your day-to-day routine look like?

As a Senior Instructor for SANS, I travel around the world to teach both FOR585, Advanced Mobile Forensics and FOR408, Windows Forensics Analysis about 10 times per year. I also teach online, which allows me to do my day job and spend two evenings a week teaching what I do all day. When I am not teaching, I am constantly testing new smartphone operating systems, apps and malware to see what is new, what the tools miss and methods for recovering the hard to find data. For FOR585, Advanced Smartphone Forensics, this is something that my co-authors and I do on a regular basis. Students rely on us to answer the hard questions and to teach them how to detect what the tools miss.   more ...

2015

Jamie Levy, Core Developer, Volatility Project

Thursday October 08, 2015 (12:48:01)   (3466 Reads)
Jamie Levy
Jamie, you’re currently working on the Volatility project. Tell us a bit more about the project and its aims.

The Volatility Framework is an open source project that allows people to analyze memory samples from various operating systems and hardware architectures. It's written in Python, which allows you to take advantage of the abundance of libraries that currently exist for forensic and reverse engineering purposes; this also allows you to run it from any operating system that has Python installed. Volatility allows you to view the memory sample as the operating system sees it (similar to WinDBG), but it also allows you to carve for objects in unallocated memory (that are inaccessible to traditional debuggers). Volatility has an easy to use API, so you can easily extend it to your needs and build custom plugins for new artifacts as well.   more ...