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Jamie Levy, Core Developer, Volatility Project

Thursday October 08, 2015 (12:48:01)   (423 Reads)
Jamie Levy
Jamie, you’re currently working on the Volatility project. Tell us a bit more about the project and its aims.

The Volatility Framework is an open source project that allows people to analyze memory samples from various operating systems and hardware architectures. It's written in Python, which allows you to take advantage of the abundance of libraries that currently exist for forensic and reverse engineering purposes; this also allows you to run it from any operating system that has Python installed. Volatility allows you to view the memory sample as the operating system sees it (similar to WinDBG), but it also allows you to carve for objects in unallocated memory (that are inaccessible to traditional debuggers). Volatility has an easy to use API, so you can easily extend it to your needs and build custom plugins for new artifacts as well.   more ...


Cosimo Anglano, Professor, University of Piemonte Orientale

Sunday September 27, 2015 (11:38:46)   (291 Reads)
Cosimo Anglano
Cosimo, please tell us about your work as an Associate Professor at the Università del Piemonte Orientale. What does a typical day look like for you?

The University of Piemonte Orientale is a mid-sized University located in Piemonte, in the North-West of Italy. I work in the Computer Science Institute, which is located in Alessandria, one of the three campuses of the university.

As a Professor, my duties are research and teaching. My current research fields are digital forensics and distributed systems. My typical day consists in doing research in the lab (both directly and by coordinating my collaborators), mentoring students, and teaching. At the moment I teach classes in Digital Forensics, in Operating Systems, and in Distributed Systems, both at the undergraduate and at the graduate level.

I am also the Director of the CyberCrime Research Center of my University, that I contributed to founding several years ago.   more ...


Keith James, Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing, AccessData

Wednesday July 29, 2015 (11:22:04)   (2614 Reads)
Keith James
Keith, please tell us about your role as EVP of Sales and Marketing at AccessData. What does your day-to-day work entail?

Customer service is my key priority. I spend a great portion of my day listening to customers, understanding their issues, and responding to their questions and concerns. My daily focus is on building better products, meeting and anticipating customer needs, and providing a better customer experience.

Your university degrees were in History and Law – what was it that made you interested in pursuing a career in digital forensics specifically?

History, Law and . . . digital forensics? I know -- at first glance they don’t seem to tie together – but the connection is that my intellectual passion is investigation. In college, I was fascinated with original source documents; not the dry textbooks, but documents written by people living in a given time and place.   more ...


Adam Hovak, Software Product Manager, Exelis

Tuesday June 02, 2015 (18:37:52)   (1035 Reads)
Adam Hovak
Adam, you’re a Software Product Manager at Exelis. Could you tell us a bit about what the company does, and what your own role involves?

We’ve had some pretty big changes at Exelis in the last few weeks; As of May 29th 2015, Exelis was officially acquired by Harris Corporation. The combined Harris/Exelis acquisition (called Harris) is a pretty large defense company, that seems to do everything from night vision goggles to the next generation FAA control system for commercial flights, to communication radios. Our office in Rome, NY focuses primarily on information assurance and information protection. We started out years ago by building transfer devices for the Department of Defense (DoD) that would allow the automated transfer of data between networks of differing classification levels. In order to do our job effectively, we’ve had to understand all types of data.   more ...


Philipp Amann, Senior Strategic Analyst, Europol

Tuesday May 26, 2015 (11:48:07)   (1951 Reads)
Philipp Amann
Philipp, you presented a paper at DFRWS about robustness and resilience in digital forensics laboratories. Could you briefly outline your research for our readers?

The main focus of our research is on identifying the key elements of resilience and robustness in digital forensics frameworks. In this paper, we aimed to identify the elements that allow an organization with digital forensic capabilities to adapt to change in a controlled and managed way; one of the main questions was how organisations can sustain their digital forensics capabilities and stay agile within controlled boundaries when dealing with new technological advances, new modi operandi, staff turnover, etc., while at the same time minimizing the risk of non-conformity i.e. ensuring that the basic principles of police work are maintained while adapting to a changing environment.   more ...