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Page 286

Final version of NIST's "Guidelines on PDA Forensics" complete

Tuesday, November 16, 2004 (14:53:30)
Special Publication 800-72, entitled Guidelines on PDA Forensics, was developed to help organizations evolve appropriate policies and procedures for dealing with PDA forensics and to provide forensic specialists with a background on the technology, tools, and principles involved. The intended audience ranges from response team members handling a computer security incident, to organizational security officials investigating an employee-related situation, to forensic examiners involved in criminal investigations.

More (IWS)

The lighter side of data recovery

Sunday, November 14, 2004 (08:30:02)
An executive who froze his broken hard disk thinking it would be fixed has topped a list of the weirdest computer mishaps.

Although computer malfunctions remain the most common cause of file loss, data recovery experts say human behaviour still is to blame in many cases.

More (BBC)

New opensource computer forensics tool - Vital Data FoRK based on PSK

Tuesday, November 09, 2004 (14:16:26)
The team at Vital Data have finished beta testing their FoRK CD and have uploaded version 1.0.0 for all members to download. It is available at forensicIT.com.au in the General Utilities - GNU / Linux - Downloads section.

It is based on the Knoppix 3.6 LiveCD, with some customisations and additions. Bugs identified during the testing were only minor, such as identification of hard drives transposing makes with model numbers, etc. These have all been corrected. We encourage everyone to download the CD, as it is an extremely useful tool to have, and we would appreciate all the testing and feedback we can get.

Stopping Computer Crime

Tuesday, November 09, 2004 (11:19:31)
Stopping computer crime requires two basic things: You need to let criminals know it won't be tolerated by reporting and prosecuting, and tell the world what these crimes are and how folks can avoid being a victim. It's not enough to know you're under attack, or that you think you're in compliance with relevant laws—you must collect the evidence supporting your assumptions.

More (MCPmag.com)

Meticulous cybersleuth takes on high-tech cases

Monday, November 08, 2004 (13:48:42)
Just call William Simon the Sherlock Holmes of computers. The cyberspace sleuth would love the comparison. In fact, he named his business, Abberline Investigations, after his distant cousin Frederick Abberline, a Victorian-era Scotland Yard investigator.

The licensed private investigator, with more than two decades of experience in computer forensics, is the go-to guy when companies need to analyze and retrieve information stored on a computer in such a way that the information can be used as evidence in a court of law.

More (HoustonChronicle.com)

Detective, check that hard drive

Monday, November 08, 2004 (13:45:26)
Noble Dean will graduate from Purdue University for the second time in December with his master’s degree in science and technology. His degree has taught the 31-year-old to look at the world in an entirely different light.

“This,” he said, pointing to his cell phone, “is increasingly becoming a piece of digital evidence that has to be investigated.”

Computer forensics research, which looks for evidence about crimes in electronic media, is a hot topic at Purdue’s School of Technology.

More (FortWayne.com)

E-mail Discovery Primer for Legal Professionals

Tuesday, November 02, 2004 (17:46:49)
A Non-Technical Primer - Taught by Warren Kruse and Steven Branigan.

From the comfort of your home or office anytime 24 hours/day, 7 days/week.

What do you need to know when making or receiving an Electronic Discovery request pertaining to e-mail? Where are you likely to find e-mail of value and how do you get it? Deleted e-mail does not mean it is gone, find out why.

Cost $95.00 (can be viewed by one or many at a time). For more
information call 732-544-8080 or e-mail [email protected]

Purdue professors train police officers to use e-mail in solving crimes

Thursday, October 28, 2004 (09:27:02)
Today at the Holiday Inn Select in Indianapolis, Purdue professors and staff will team up with the National White Collar Crime Center to teach 110 Indiana police officers about e-mail forensics. The training session is part two of a previous session that taught officers about examining hard drives on computers, said Marcus Rogers, associate professor of computer technology and one of the trainers of the class. The session will focus on using e-mail as evidence to help law enforcement solve crimes faster and more efficiently.

More (The Exponent)

Easy to defeat computer forensics

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (08:24:30)
Breaking into computer networks and remaining untraceable after the breach has been detected is apparently easier than anyone would like it to be, said The Grugq, a Britain-based hacker. The Grugq, who refused to reveal his true identity, said remaining undetectable, even from computer forensics experts, is achievable with freely available tools that can be downloaded from the Internet. “The scary thing is that it’s very easy to do. Law enforcement officers rely on expensive commercial tools rather than knowledge,” he said.

More (The Star)

Data recovery, Australian style

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (08:20:59)
A couple of Australian coppers have used their forensic expertise to create a software company that has chalked up success in Europe and Japan. And by Christmas they will be showing the Yanks how as well. The two "dumped-data detectives" once helped authorities with the One.Tel, HIH and Rene Rivkin investigations, and are now helping businesses find lost data and files.

More (Australian IT)