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Page 290

Easy to defeat computer forensics

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (13:24:30)
Breaking into computer networks and remaining untraceable after the breach has been detected is apparently easier than anyone would like it to be, said The Grugq, a Britain-based hacker. The Grugq, who refused to reveal his true identity, said remaining undetectable, even from computer forensics experts, is achievable with freely available tools that can be downloaded from the Internet. “The scary thing is that it’s very easy to do. Law enforcement officers rely on expensive commercial tools rather than knowledge,” he said.

More (The Star)

Data recovery, Australian style

Wednesday, October 27, 2004 (13:20:59)
A couple of Australian coppers have used their forensic expertise to create a software company that has chalked up success in Europe and Japan. And by Christmas they will be showing the Yanks how as well. The two "dumped-data detectives" once helped authorities with the One.Tel, HIH and Rene Rivkin investigations, and are now helping businesses find lost data and files.

More (Australian IT)

FBI agents use computer forensics to arrest sexual predators

Sunday, October 24, 2004 (16:28:46)
It's not surprising that FBI Special Agent Tom Veivia considers himself an overprotective parent. In a cramped room equipped with eight computers, Veivia works with undercover agents and police officers in the Innocent Images National Initiative. Working late evening and early morning hours at FBI headquarters on State Street, these undercover agents and officers have made 11 arrests since September 2003.

More (ctnow.com)

Jackson Local Law Enforcement Learns to Fight Cyber Crime

Sunday, October 24, 2004 (16:19:35)
In the world of cyber crimes, law enforcement officials need the same computer skills as criminals to fight back. This week, metro area law enforcement is getting the ammunition to fight the growing number of computer crime suspects.

More (WLBT)

High-Tech Crimes Revealed: An Interview with Stephen Branigan

Friday, October 22, 2004 (13:39:29)
Stephen Branigan, one of the founders of the New York City task force on cybercrime and author of High-Tech Crimes Revealed: Cyberwar Stories from the Digital Front, talks to Seth Fogie about hacker motivations and how to solve cyber crimes.

More (informit.com)

Computer expert challenges barge defendant's testimony

Thursday, October 21, 2004 (11:28:38)
A computer forensics expert says a critical document presented to jurors was edited on one of the defendants' work computers -- contradicting the defendant's testimony last week. That's the latest in the fraud and conspiracy trial of four former Merrill Lynch and Company executives and two former midlevel Enron executives.

More (KLTV)

e-crime and computer evidence conference 2005 (ECCE2005): Programme now availabl

Wednesday, October 20, 2004 (14:45:48)
ECCE 2005 will consider aspects of digital evidence in all types of criminal activity, including timelines, methods of evidence deposition, use of computers for court presentation, system vulnerabilities, crime prevention etc.

The conference programme is now online and can be viewed at the ECCE website here.

TV crime shows spark boom in ‘duff’ university forensic courses

Sunday, October 17, 2004 (16:39:26)
A LEADING police scientist has claimed universities are promoting forensic science courses to meet demand from students inspired by TV crime series just to put “bums on seats”. Jim Fraser swaps police fieldwork for teaching and research this week when he joins the University of Strathclyde as head of their world-leading forensic science unit. He said a public interest in “gore”, fuelled by TV shows such as Silent Witness and CSI, had made forensics courses hip. More than 53 UK higher education institutions offer over 300 courses with “forensic” in the title. But Fraser, currently head of forensic investigation at Kent Police, said many universities were offering courses which were of little use .

More (Sunday Herald)

Sleuthing in the e-files

Saturday, October 16, 2004 (10:24:39)
These days, the search for truth takes lawyers not into company file cabinets but into company computers. With 93 percent of business documents now "borne" electronically, the story of U.S. workplaces increasingly gets told on computer disks, spread sheets and e-mail records. Attorneys and business leaders say electronic discovery is the biggest development in employment law in years.

More (startribune.com)

Forensic experts track printer fingerprints

Saturday, October 16, 2004 (10:21:29)
Researchers at Purdue University have developed image analysis techniques that may one day help tie counterfeit money and forged documents to the printers that produced them. In lab experiments, the researchers examined documents that came from 12 different models of printers and were able to correctly link a document to its printer 11 times. The techniques currently let forensic investigators match a document with only a specific printer model, but will be honed so that a document can be matched to a particular printer.

More (ZDNet)