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Page 298

Cyber Crime Fears Grow in the Bahamas

Friday, September 16, 2005 (18:32:38)
Attorney General Alfred Sears said on Tuesday the use of computers in criminal activity within the financial industry is growing. Minister Sears made the comment after giving opening remarks at the Caribbean Cyber crime workshop at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in downtown Nassau. Drawing scores of participants from countries like St. Lucia, Belize, Antigua & Barbuda, the United States, Grenada, Jamaica, Belize and Jamaica, the three-day seminar is aimed at providing essential background information to help improve cyber crime investigations...

More (The Bahama Journal)

BCS (Essex) talk - Computer Forensics with Russell May from Guidance Software

Thursday, September 15, 2005 (21:57:10)
20/09/2005 1830 at APU, Chelmsford

A look at Computer Forensics and the methodology for retrieving static data from modern storage media. A short ten minute presentation outlining the basic principles of computer forensics, followed by a live demonstration of forensic data recovery techniques, giving an insight into methods used to discover obfuscated or hidden data.

Russell May BSc (Hons) CITP CEng MBCS EnCE, is Manager of Special and Partner Projects (Europe, Middle East, Africa, India, Russia) at Guidance Software Inc.

This event starts with refreshments at 6:30 pm and ends at approximately 9:15 pm, followed by networking opportunities. To help with numbers and the production of the list of attendees, please register in advance.

More (BCS Essex)

The growing digital forensics industry

Thursday, September 15, 2005 (17:30:51)
The increasing use of devices like cell phones, PDAs, and USB drives is also expanding the number of digital footprints people leave. Those footprints are potentially valuable for prosecutors looking to establish a suspect's motives are whereabouts related to a crime. And some crimes are committed by sophisticated hackers and require a response by equally savvy technicians...

More (Future Tense)

[The RealAudio link didn't work for me, hopefully just a temporary problem - Jamie]

Missouri Southern State University purchases LogiCube MD5

Wednesday, September 14, 2005 (17:30:52)
The Criminal Justice Department at Missouri Southern State University recently purchased a LogiCube MD5 to enhance its Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) program.The MD5 is used by the F.B.I., D.E.A., A.T.F., Interpol and other major international law enforcement agencies to secure critical evidence from computer hard drives during crime scene investigations...

More (Joplin Independent)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (265 reads)

Secret Service takes lead fighting financial crimes

Monday, September 12, 2005 (22:48:40)
About once a month, more than three dozen area law enforcement and corporate investigators gather at Chef's Restaurant to compare notes. The informal assembly, known as the Financial and Electronic Crimes Working Group, meets regularly to share information on crime trends and ongoing investigations that multiple agencies may unknowingly be involved with. They also receive special training on how to detect and prevent a variety of financial or electronic crimes...

More (Buffalo News)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (510 reads)

The cost of online anonymity

Sunday, September 11, 2005 (22:46:26)
Digital evidence expert at the London School of Economics, Peter Sommer says: "A few years ago I was very much in favour of libertarian computing. "What changed my mind was the experience of acting in the English courts as a computer expert and examining large numbers of computers from really nasty people, who were using precisely the same sort of technology in order to conceal their activities..."

More (BBC)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (283 reads)

RCFL Network Launches 9th Laboratory

Saturday, September 10, 2005 (16:05:54)
The Northwest Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory (NWRCFL) officially opened yesterday in Portland, Oregon. The NWRCFL will supply digital forensics expertise and training to hundreds of law enforcement agencies throughout all of Oregon and southwestern Washington. The NWRCFL is the ninth laboratory to join a national network of Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) affiliated digital evidence facilities. Five additional RCFLs are scheduled to open by the end of 2006 in cities around the country...

More (FBI)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (348 reads)

Alternative browsers pose challenge for cybersleuths

Wednesday, September 07, 2005 (21:17:45)
Internet Explorer hides nothing from police and other investigators who examine PCs to discover which sites the user has visited, according to a class held Wedensday at the annual training meeting of the High Tech Crime Investigation Association. Investigators know the location of the IE browser cache, cookie files and history, and they know how to read those files. Also, popular forensics tools can help out. But that story changes when it comes to alternative Web browsers such as Firefox and Opera, instructor Glenn Lewis said at the well-attended session. These programs use different structures, files and naming conventions for the data that investigators are after. And files are in a different location on the hard drive, which can cause trouble for examiners. Furthermore, forensics software may not support the Web browsers, he said...

More (news.com)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (475 reads)

New South Wales workplace watchdog law 'a formality'

Wednesday, September 07, 2005 (21:15:23)
The use of email and computer facilities in NSW workplaces will be under watch from October when the Workplace Surveillance Act comes into force, but the head of an email security firm says there is nothing to fear. Peter Croft, the managing director of Clearswift, said the act simply meant that there would be an agreed policy about the use of workplace facilities that both the employer and employee understood. "The act simply says says employers must tell staff that their work email is being monitored. At the same time, staff must understand that if they use the web on their work computer, there are systems in place to track and filter where they surf," he said. NSW will be the first Australian state to bring such a law into force. Victoria and Queensland are set to follow...

More (smh.com.au)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (247 reads)

ICTA starts training in computer crimes enforcement for Sri Lanka police

Wednesday, September 07, 2005 (13:51:05)
When draft legislation for computer crimes was submitted to parliament recently, the Ministry of Defence together with the Information and Communication Technology Agency of Sri Lanka (ICTA) took necessary steps to establish a Computer Crimes Unit at the Police Department. “This Unit is establishing computer forensic skills to facilitate the investigation of computer crime,” Jayantha Fernando, legal advisor to ICTA, says...

More (ColomboPage)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (435 reads)