±Forensic Focus Partners

Become an advertising partner

±Your Account


Username
Password

Forgotten password/username?

Site Members:

New Today: 1 Overall: 34187
New Yesterday: 6 Visitors: 190

±Follow Forensic Focus

Forensic Focus Facebook PageForensic Focus on TwitterForensic Focus LinkedIn GroupForensic Focus YouTube Channel

RSS feeds: News Forums Articles

±Latest Articles

RSS Feed Widget

±Latest Webinars

Page 300

CFP: DFRWS -- Extended Deadline

Wednesday, June 01, 2005 (22:40:33)
From Brian Carrier:

The paper submission deadline for DFRWS 2005 has been extended until
Friday June 3, 2005. For those who have already submitted papers, you can
still edit your submission on the server. For those who requested an
extension or are behind because of the long weekend, you have a few more
days to finish your papers. For those who are hearing about the Digital
Forensic Research Workshop for the first time, you can refer to the Call
For Papers and consider submitting a paper or panel proposal.

http://www.dfrws.org/2005/

An Inside Look at a Disk Recovery Service

Wednesday, June 01, 2005 (19:10:06)
In many failure-related cases, the chances of recovering data from a hard disk range from good to very good. If the electronic system is the only thing affected, then the drive can often be reused after the control panel has been replaced. If, on the other hand, the defect is of a mechanical nature, then recovery will be a bit more difficult. So long as the drive components can be replaced, expenses can be kept to a minimum. However, if special equipment is required, then the bill will quickly run up into the range of four figures...

More (Tom's Hardware Guide)

Used hard drives betray company secrets

Wednesday, June 01, 2005 (10:12:56)
A study of 200 hard drives bought on eBay this year reveals that over 70 per cent contained sensitive personal or business data. German data recovery firm O&O Software was able to recover 3.3 million files, including 40,000 Word documents, 15,000 Excel spreadsheets and about 50 complete email inboxes. In one case a large German bank left details of customer credit ratings in files which O&O said were only protected by being labelled 'Highly Confidential'. The report also mentions finding what it calls 'onion drives'. These are drives that have been formatted by users and still left with data written onto the hard drive...

More (computing)

New Article: Developing A Framework For Evaluating Computer Forensic Tools

Monday, May 30, 2005 (19:00:41)
A paper by Colin Armstrong (of Curtin University of Technology in Australia) entitled "Developing A Framework For Evaluating Computer Forensic Tools" is now available online.

The paper can be read here.

A list of other articles and papers available at Forensic Focus can be found here, new submissions are always welcome.

EnCase Device Configuration Overlay Data Acquisition Weakness

Monday, May 30, 2005 (12:41:17)
Arne Vidström has reported a weakness in EnCase, which can be exploited to hide information on a disk. The weakness is caused due to missing support of Device Configuration Overlays (DCO) and therefore causes the program to not acquire parts of a disk using this feature. The weakness has been reported in EnCase Forensic Edition 4.18a. Other versions may also be affected...

More (Secunia)

New Paper: The Forensic Chain of Evidence Model

Friday, May 27, 2005 (23:19:57)
A paper by Atif Ahmad entitled "The Forensic Chain of Evidence Model - Improving the Process of Evidence Collection in Incident Handling Procedures" is now available online.

The paper can be read here.

A full list of papers and articles at Forensic Focus can be found here. New submissions are always welcome.

Online crime - new tools, old tricks

Friday, May 27, 2005 (11:51:42)
This week virus writers took a further step into the underworld when they released a Trojan horse program that holds computer data hostage unless you pay $200. The program infects computers through a weakness in Internet Explorer. It finds files with certain extensions, '.doc' for instance, encrypts them and then demands you pay up or never see your data again...Unfortunately, given that UK police resources are creaking under a two-year backlog of computer crime cases, criminals are probably not feeling too much heat...


More (silicon.com)

Montana agencies left private information on discarded computers

Thursday, May 26, 2005 (13:33:53)
State agencies failed to remove private information before retiring outdated state computers, risking public disclosure of Social Security and credit card numbers, medical records and income taxes, a new report discloses. The legislative audit, obtained Tuesday, blamed unclear state policy for the computer hard drives not being properly "scrubbed" before the machines were donated to school districts, given to other state agencies or sold to the public...

More (SignOnSanDiego.com)

e-Cops playing catch-up in Oz

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 (11:00:09)
Australia's electronic crime investigators are at risk of being outrun by new technology, one of the country's senior computer forensic technicians has revealed. Australian Federal Police (AFP) Electronic Evidence Forensic and Technical co-ordinator Paul Reedy said police investigators would have to spend their training budgets wisely in order to keep pace as with technological changes. "The rate at which systems we encounter is changing is so rapidly that it's difficult to stay across all of it. We've been looking at alternative ways of doing it in terms of resources and training. I'm satisfied with the level that we are at but we've got to target our training very carefully," Mr Reedy said.

(Australian IT)

New Article: The Essentials Of Computer Discovery

Tuesday, May 24, 2005 (17:23:52)
A new article by Joan E. Feldman of Computer Forensics Inc. entitled "The Essentials Of Computer Discovery" is now online.

The article can be read here.