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Piracy case: log files 'don't show downloads'

Wednesday, February 09, 2005 (10:40:38)
An expert witness in the MP3s4free.net music piracy case has conceded to the Federal Court in Sydney that log files seized in a 2003 raid did not show music actually being downloaded. During cross-examination and after long arguments about the admissibility of evidence, Gilbert & Tobin IT consultant Shane Pearson conceded that the seized log files could be skewed by certain factors including proxy caching and dial-up failure. Yesterday's evidence included a demonstration of the web site by computer forensics expert John Thackray...



More (The Age)

Teachers cleared in school probe

Tuesday, February 08, 2005 (21:57:16)
Forensic computing techniques proved decisive in proving staff at a Buckinghamshire primary school had not been surfing for porn at work. The head of the school called in Disklabs, a computer forensics and data firm, last year when he discovered web folders with pornographic content on a PC used by pupils. The history of these folders suggested a creation date during lesson time and a modified date on a teacher-training day...

More (The Register)

Computer Forensic Services Managing Partner to Present at MIS Training Institute

Tuesday, February 08, 2005 (07:55:02)
Computer Forensic Services, LLC (CFS), has announced that managing partner Warren Kruse is scheduled to present at MIS Training Institute's event "Cracking E-Fraud: How to Detect, Investigate, and Prevent Electronic Crime" held from June 20-23 in Boston, MA. An internationally recognized data forensics expert and current president of the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA), Kruse is slated to offer the following presentations during the event:

* Understanding Software Forensic Tools, June 22nd, 8:45 am to 10:00 am * Handling Evidence in E-Fraud Investigations, June 22nd, 10:10 am to 11:20 am * Keynote Panel: Catching the Culprits of Cyber Fraud: Forensic Innovators and Pacesetting Organizations, June 22nd, 4:10 pm to 5:15 pm, * Understanding the Investigative Process from A to Z, June 23rd, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

More (ArriveNet)

Phishing suspect arrested in the UK

Monday, February 07, 2005 (12:37:44)
UK Police have arrested a 21-year-old man they suspect of running a phishing scam that targeted customers of online bank Smile. The unnamed man has been released on bail while a specialist data forensics team examines computer equipment that was seized from his home in Blackpool, according to antivirus firm Sophos.

More (ZDNet Australia)

The secret war against hackers

Monday, February 07, 2005 (12:36:21)
Gavin Hyde-Blake, the manager of IT forensics at Carratu International, the corporate investigation company, offers a crumb of comfort to besieged corporates. "Most hackers are lazy," he says. "Make their life difficult and most will walk away."

More (Telegraph)

Seize the data

Friday, February 04, 2005 (12:07:43)
You can dust for fingerprints after a robbery, but you wouldn't dust a hard drive after a cybercrime. That's where computer forensics comes in. It helps law enforcement agents copy and analyze information stored on hard drives and devices such as cell phones and BlackBerrys. One of the newest computer forensics systems on the market is the portable RoadMASSter II from Intelligent Computer Solutions. It looks like a thick metal briefcase on wheels and opens to reveal a keyboard, 15-inch thin-film transistor color LCD display and data-copying devices...

More (FCW.com)

Real-life CSI vastly different than what's on TV

Thursday, February 03, 2005 (10:45:14)
Crime scene investigators for the Warner Robins Police Department (US) have a lot of the crime-fighting gadgets that actors do on the popular CSI television shows. And there are other similarities between what real-life CSI investigators do and what's portrayed on TV. But there also are some key differences. Lt. John Lanneau, who heads the CSI division for the Warner Robins Police Department, said his team, like TV, employs the use of expensive tools to gather evidence - he has $10,000 worth of computer forensics equipment and a specialized CSI investigator trained to find evidence hidden in a computer hard drive...

More (Macon Telegraph)

Computer based crime linked to international crime syndicates

Wednesday, February 02, 2005 (16:25:07)
Andrew Clark, director and co-founder of Inforenz, spends much of his time as an expert forensics witness for the UK government, banks, and MNCs. He notes that there are signs that computer-based crimes are becoming the province of international organised crime syndicates. He cautions if that spiralled out of control, the effect of computer based crime could seriously damage the critical infrastructure and trading situation of nation states.

More (Network Computing Asia)

Digital evidence: Today's fingerprints

Tuesday, February 01, 2005 (14:08:08)
Police and prosecutors are fashioning a new weapon in their arsenal against criminals: digital evidence. The sight of hard drives, Internet files and e-mails as courtroom evidence is increasingly common. "Digital evidence is becoming a feature of most criminal cases," said Susan Brenner, professor of law and technology at the University of Dayton School of Law, in an e-mail response for this article. "Everything is moving in this direction." Digital evidence may play a significant role in the trial of pop superstar Michael Jackson on charges of child molestation...

More (CNN)

DOD seized 60TB in search for Iraq battle plan leak

Monday, January 31, 2005 (11:43:17)
The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) seized hundreds of computers and around 60T bytes of data as part of an investigation into how details of the U.S. invasion plan for Operation Iraqi Freedom were leaked to The New York Times, a DOD official said. The investigation ended in 2003 without finding the source of the leak. However, it has prompted changes within the department, which is developing new software tools and investigative strategies for computer crime cases that involve large amounts of data, said Lt. Col Ken Zatyko, director of the DOD's Computer Forensics Laboratory.

More (Computerworld)