±Forensic Focus Partners

Become an advertising partner

±Your Account


Username
Password

Forgotten password/username?

Site Members:

New Today: 0 Overall: 34489
New Yesterday: 1 Visitors: 138

±Follow Forensic Focus

Forensic Focus Facebook PageForensic Focus on TwitterForensic Focus LinkedIn GroupForensic Focus YouTube Channel

RSS feeds: News Forums Articles

±Latest Articles

±Latest Webinars

Page 288

Search on This Topic: News

[ Go to Home | Select a New Topic ]

File System Forensic Analysis

Friday, October 07, 2005 (14:18:48)
The field of investigative forensics has seen a huge surge in interest lately, with many looking to study it because of shows like CSI or the increasing coverage of computer-related crimes. Some people see a career opportunity there, and are moving toward computer forensics, marrying both law enforcement and investigations with their interest in things digital. Central to this field is the study of data storage and recovery, which requires a deep knowledge of how filesystems work. Brian Carrier's new book File System Forensic Analysis covers this topic with clarity and an uncommon skill...

More (Slashdot)

And some other opinions:

http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/24.01.html#subj17
http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/24.02.html#subj16

[Personally, I'm only about a third of the way through it - Jamie]
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 4 / 5
  • (709 reads)

Sony Selects Guidance Software for Upcoming Movie

Friday, October 07, 2005 (13:56:14)
Sony Pictures Television is portraying the digital investigation that put BTK behind bars for life by drawing from Guidance Software's forensic experts. Guidance CEO John Colbert, who has 14 years of law enforcement experience, served as a strategic technical advisor for the production. Colbert helped producers properly portray how Encase was utilized during the investigation.

More (press release)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (674 reads)

Litigation Forum Review: Embracing technology

Thursday, October 06, 2005 (17:09:01)
Computer forensic experts can retrieve hidden or lost data, as well as provide evidence as to whether files have been damaged or tampered with. They can reveal evidence of the conduct of those people who had access to the computer, and recreate computer-related events. Electronic disclosure can make discovery more efficient, less time consuming and less costly, if it is properly managed and supervised. However, on account of the volume of information that can be stored electronically and its dynamic, rather than static, nature, if it is not effectively managed, it can increase discovery costs and delays...

More (Legal IT)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (366 reads)

Computer sleuthing turning cops into geeks

Thursday, October 06, 2005 (11:53:22)
Computers and their criminal investigation capabilities turned Dori Schulze, an Internal Revenue Service special agent, into a self-proclaimed "geek" by the early 1990s. That initial embrace of computers by her and her employer led to the largest retail tax evasion conviction at the time. She used a computer to gather evidence against Stew Leonard Sr., the founder of Stew Leonard’s Dairy in Norwalk, who was convicted of evading $6.8 million in taxes in 1993...

More (New Haven Register)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (333 reads)

Expert witness questions CP jailings

Wednesday, October 05, 2005 (15:23:27)
A witness in computer crime trials has called for the release of individuals convicted of CP offences based entirely on material found on their hard drives. Jason Coombes, who has been involved in computer crime trials since 1994, issued a statement calling on police to be more thorough in their investigations. The expert contends that third-party control of a PC which is then used to store or view CP images could lead to the conviction of innocent people...

More (vnunet.com)

Web helps criminals trap victims

Tuesday, October 04, 2005 (15:10:35)
Malicious hackers and hi-tech criminals are changing tactics in a bid to outwit security firms. Statistics show that tech-savvy criminals are starting to turn away from e-mailed viruses to webpages to snare their victims. Also, say security firms, criminals are using spyware to get hold of personal data they can sell or use themselves...

More (BBC)

FSU grad students design trap for cyberstalkers

Tuesday, October 04, 2005 (14:25:09)
In a tiny corner room of an old building on the Florida State University campus, graduate students have been stalking each other. The computer science researchers were trying to design a police trap - of hardware and software - for cyberstalkers. A trap they've apparently completed. "This is giving law enforcement a new tool in their belt for these new technology crimes," said Special Agent Bob Breeden, head of the Florida Computer Crime Center...

More (Tallahassee.com)

New paper: Real-Time Steganalysis

Tuesday, October 04, 2005 (04:02:35)
A new paper entitled "Real-Time Steganalysis", authored by James E. Wingate and Chad W. Davis, is now online and can be viewed here.

A list of all papers and articles at Forensic Focus can be found here. Further contributions are encouraged and always welcome.
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (427 reads)

More than 50% of companies suffered from cybercrime

Monday, October 03, 2005 (16:10:03)
More than half of European companies polled in a survey on global network risk admitted that they have suffered significant financial damage as a result of IT system failure in the last 12 months. The survey, conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by ACE European Group (NYSE:ACE), polled senior risk managers and business leaders throughout Europe. The research also showed that close to 40% of those surveyed had experienced losses as a result of damage or misuse of systems or data by staff or contractors and that nearly 25% had suffered as a result of computer crime, including 'phishing' - using forged emails or website pages to obtain data - and hacking...

More (Computer Crime Research Center)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (280 reads)

Can Digital Photos Be Trusted?

Sunday, October 02, 2005 (04:36:58)
In this new fast paced digital age, anyone can use inexpensive software to doctor up photos, and their handiwork is becoming increasingly difficult to spot. "Everyone is buying low-cost, high-quality digital cameras, everyone has a Web site, everyone has e-mail, Photoshop is easier to use; 2004 was the first year sales of digital cameras outpaced traditional film cameras," says Hany Farid, a Dartmouth College computer scientist and a leading researcher in the nascent realm of digital forensics. "Consequently, there are more and more cases of high-profile digital tampering. Seeing is no longer believing. Actually, what you see is largely irrelevant."

More (Popular Science)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (340 reads)