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Reviews

Reviews

2015


2015

Learning Android Forensics

Learning Android Forensics
Reviewed by Scar de Courcier, Forensic Focus

Learning Android Forensics
was written by Rohit Tamma and Donnie Tindall, and aims to provide a thorough introduction to the forensic analysis of smartphones running the Android operating system, from the initial setup of a forensic workstation through to analysing some of the more important artefacts. With input from highly experienced reviewers in the digital forensics field, the book is an excellent resource for students and practitioners alike.

The idea for the book was born out of a desire to help practitioners to understand what goes on in the background when they press a 'Find Evidence' button on a forensics tool. To make this process easier, the authors have focused on free and open source tools throughout the book, which again makes it an accessible read.   more ...

2015

ReclaiMe Pro

ReclaiMe Pro
Reviewed by Scar de Courcier

I would be tempted to argue that you can tell a lot about a piece of software by how easy it is to install.

There are times when finding, downloading and installing a product update feels like repeatedly banging your head on a brick wall: constant freezing, confused Windows popups, license key errors...

Then there are times when you click 'Download', then 'Install', then tick 'Yes' in the little box, and boom! The software appears.

I am pleased to be able to report that the installation process of ReclaiMe Pro falls into the second category. It can be found on the Download page of the website, and it sets itself up in just a few minutes.

After that, of course, it's time to get down to business.   more ...

2015

AccessData FTK Advanced Live Online Training

FTK Advanced Live Online Training Manual
Reviewed by Scar de Courcier, Forensic Focus

On the 11th-13th of August 2015, AccessData ran a live online training course to teach FTK users how to get the most out of the software solution. The course was aimed at people who had already used FTK and completed some basic training beforehand, and aimed to expand investigators’ knowledge of the tool.

The training itself was managed by Syntricate which, although technically a part of AccessData, was created to offer training and education for digital forensics professionals. Syntricate aims to be as platform-agnostic as possible during training courses and provides a range of training options with many of the well-known digital forensics companies.   more ...

2015

Learning iOS Forensics

Learning iOS Forensics
Reviewed by Scar de Courcier, Forensic Focus

Learning iOS Forensics is a practical textbook that aims to help digital forensics examiners of all levels to get to grips with the procedures involved in forensically analysing iOS devices.

The book opens with a preface, which describes how the various sections are set out and delineates the recommended audience. It explains that the book can either be read sequentially or used as a reference work in ongoing investigations. My own experience of reading the book would back this up – I read it from cover to cover and found it to be an excellent resource for iOS forensics, both as someone who has not yet come across an iOS device in an investigation, and as someone who is interested in digital forensics as a discipline.   more ...

2015

Mobile Phone Examiner Plus (MPE+) - Part 2

Mobile Phone Examiner Plus (MPE+)
Reviewed by Si Biles, Thinking Security

One of the things that I love about being in IT is that it is an ever changing field. I find myself coming across new things daily. This even occasionally applies to my own “infrastructure”, such as it is. Once upon a time, in a land far, far away (well, Scotland) I started my IT career as a Linux SysAdmin – bouncing around corporate IT departments and getting into security. I strayed for a long time from this true path. I covered my guilt by generally trying to use a Mac, because at least it had a BSD based operating system, but I have once again seen the light, and have returned to my “root”s (hopefully at least one or two UNIX people got that joke). Actually, the truth of the matter is that my MacBook Pro – the one that the first part of this review was written on – has become horribly unreliable and has had to be replaced. It is being put out to pasture at home, being a 17” model, as a NetFlicks streamer. However, this has left a big gap for me – one that I wasn't sure how to fill...   more ...