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where to buy the next box of HDDs?

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jhup
 jhup
(@jhup)
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It is time again to buy a pack-of-20 hard drives for various purposes.

Where do you get this consumable?

Have you thought of getting a box of SSDs?

 
Posted : 14/10/2010 3:59 am
mjantal
(@mjantal)
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I usually get them at newegg.com….i haven't had the need to get 20 at the time (yet), but they carry them in 20-packs.

 
Posted : 14/10/2010 4:19 am
jhup
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any specific brand and model you prefer?

 
Posted : 15/10/2010 11:05 pm
beasleyjt
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I just received a shipment of 35 2.5" HDDs from a private source, but we (my lab) order them from newegg, cdw, tigerdirect and many others. Before we use them we put a few into a hex viewer to see if they are new or referb. 99% of the time they are new and have zero issues with them.

 
Posted : 10/02/2011 8:02 am
douglasbrush
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I have been using the Segate Barracudas a lot and have been happy. New Egg should have OEM 20 packs. Hitachi next. Nothing "green" from any of the brands. Sometimes I find they just act funky - maybe something on their controller cards for the energy saving - could just have been bad luck though.

 
Posted : 10/02/2011 9:38 pm
Xennith
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Have you thought of getting a box of SSDs?

SSD; around £2 per GB.
HDD; around £0.20 per GB.

 
Posted : 10/02/2011 10:57 pm
jhup
 jhup
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Have you thought of getting a box of SSDs?

SSD; around £2 per GB.
HDD; around £0.20 per GB.

cost benefit analysis on time of throughput speed over life of drive versus initial extra cost . . .

 
Posted : 11/02/2011 5:05 am
Patrick4n6
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Have you thought of getting a box of SSDs?

SSD; around £2 per GB.
HDD; around £0.20 per GB.

cost benefit analysis on time of throughput speed over life of drive versus initial extra cost . . .

Throughput of sequential data is definitely not the value proposition of SSDs. Especially if most of your source data is on rotational drives. I have my FTK3 DB on an SSD and it rocks, but working image is still sitting on a RAID for processing after initial capture to a single 7200 RPM drive in most cases.

 
Posted : 16/02/2011 10:43 pm
jhup
 jhup
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Agreed.

Most of my work revolves around very small files, not accessed sequentially.

To me the cost/benefit ratio is much closer . . .

 
Posted : 17/02/2011 1:54 am
CJ_Centeno
(@cj_centeno)
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I just received a shipment of 35 2.5" HDDs from a private source, but we (my lab) order them from newegg, cdw, tigerdirect and many others. Before we use them we put a few into a hex viewer to see if they are new or referb. 99% of the time they are new and have zero issues with them.

I am new to the field as I am still in school waiting to start my core classes. My question is how exactly do you get hash value on a new hard drive?

 
Posted : 29/06/2012 8:00 pm
jhup
 jhup
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wipe
partition
format
hash

 
Posted : 30/06/2012 12:17 am
mscotgrove
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[quote="CJ_Centeno
I am new to the field as I am still in school waiting to start my core classes. My question is how exactly do you get hash value on a new hard drive?[/quote]

Why do you want to hash a new drive?

It depends on the type/size of partition, any serial number added, etc etc. You will also need to know what you expect for a FAT32, Linux XFS, NTFS disk of the EXACT size, with same serial number.

Surely a much better check is that all logical sectors are zeros. This probably best performed after a wipe, rather than after a partition.

A hash value is only useful to know if 'A' matches 'B' exactly, and they are the same size. It does not indicate both are blank, unless you already know that 'A' or 'B' is blank. One sector different in size and it will fail the match, even though both disks may be blank.

 
Posted : 30/06/2012 3:36 am
CJ_Centeno
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Why do you want to hash a new drive?

From the text I have been reading when using a new hard during and investigation you are suppose to match the hash that you took when you acquired the new drive to the hash it has before you use it. As you said "A matches to B"

 
Posted : 30/06/2012 8:26 am
BitHead
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Seems we are getting away from the original topic, but I will throw this out there I know when we used to clone drives you had to make sure the drive was wiped, but do many people still do that? If you are imaging to a forensic container (E01, etc.), why wipe the drive?

 
Posted : 30/06/2012 10:28 am
jhup
 jhup
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Because lawyers tend to ask just the questions about things that is usually considered unnecessary.

It costs me only 15 minutes to kick off a wipe and hash of a target drive.

It would cost me hours of court time to explain why it is not necessary to wipe when using a container.

 
Posted : 30/06/2012 7:56 pm
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