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4n6art
(@4n6art)
Active Member

Hi all

Looking for any assistance on this

- friend owns his own company and supplies and pays for cell phones for certain field employees.
- he would like to monitor sms mms and gps locations at the very least on those phones
- employees will know that the app is on the phone, however, admin should be notified if app is deleted from phone.
- need both iOS and android app

Any other bells and whistles would be a plus.

If anyone knows of a service or app that they have used or installed for a client, would appreciate any help.

Thanks
-=Art=-

Quote
Posted : 25/01/2017 8:54 pm
jaclaz
(@jaclaz)
Community Legend

My small advice would be to be very, VERY sure that doing that is actually legal in the specific country, more than just asking "a" lawyer, I would want a written legal opinion on the matter by a lawyer specialized in civil and employment Laws.

It sounds like something that will need - if legal at all - some serious contractual paperwork, with the workers allowing explicitly this kind of control and - very likely - some specific guarantee on the access to and management of the resulting data.

jaclaz

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/01/2017 11:23 pm
4n6art
(@4n6art)
Active Member

Good advice Jaclaz and thanks. Yes, he has been made painfully aware to get a couple of written legal opinions on this from his Attorneys along with having proper releases signed etc before I would help him do any of this.

Was just trying to see if anyone knew of any software that would do that.

-=Art=-

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/01/2017 12:47 am
UnallocatedClusters
(@unallocatedclusters)
Senior Member

A small and free technique Insist and enforce all employees using company controlled Apple IDs.

If employees use their personal Apple IDs, then when employees leave the company, they will be able to easily steal trade secrets by simply buying a new iPhone, logging into their Apple ID and downloading their iCloud backup (containing all of the previous employer's data) to their new iPhones.

Also, malicious minded ex-employees could remotely wipe their former employer's iPhones using their AppleID.

If one forces employees to use company controlled Apple IDs (such as company email address), then one could use Elcomsoft's Phone Breaker, for example, to download mobile backups from the iCloud from any employee's iPhone and analyze using one's preferred analysis tool. Employee will not know Elcomsoft PB has been employed.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 8:35 am
jaclaz
(@jaclaz)
Community Legend

In other words, you want a kid tracking software 😯 .
Examples
https://kidtrackmobile.com/
http//www.gpsphonetracker.org/start-monitoring/
http//logger.mobi/
http//www.mobistealth.com/cell-phone-tracker
http//www.toptenreviews.com/software/privacy/best-cell-phone-monitoring-software/

jaclaz

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 5:48 pm
passcodeunlock
(@passcodeunlock)
Senior Member

@jaclaz kid tracking softwares - ingenious idea )

I still doubt using any of those at company level would be all legal and ethical.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 8:25 pm
jaclaz
(@jaclaz)
Community Legend

I still doubt using any of those at company level would be all legal and ethical.

Yep, but as said particular countries (and particular states in the case of the US) may actually allow - with a well worded signed binding agreement - such things.

To me - personally - GPS tracking of an employer smartphone is nothing but a modern form of slavery, but if and where it is legal, it's OK.

Overlooking and accessing "at least" SMS's and MMS's (unconditionally) it is instead a form of invasion of privacy that I doubt anyone can - even voluntarily - forfeit in most countries, particularly in the case of BYOD. ?

Just in case
http//www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=91bb710d-acbb-4c9d-98fd-b546d717c45d

One thing is GPS tracking a (company) vehicle, and another is to track a device such a smartphone (company issued or personal) that more or less the employee has always with him/her, and yet another is accessing SMS's (or MMS's, or e-mail's or other messaging) unless it is strictly restricted to "work" accounts and times and some serious protection of the data thus gathered is implemented.

More than what the Law says the underlying issue is that the employer trusts not the employee, and no matter if this lack of trust is justified or not, as a general rule you'd better work for someone that trusts you (if you are an employee) and you'd better hire someone that you can trust and then trust him/her (if you are an employer).

jaclaz

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 10:08 pm
UnallocatedClusters
(@unallocatedclusters)
Senior Member

My friend who owns a hedge fund company uses AirWatch http//www.air-watch.com/

All employees are informed that their activities are being monitored upfront.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 10:44 pm
RolfGutmann
(@rolfgutmann)
Community Legend

Why, really why does this guy need this EmployeeTrackApp? A good employer will never impose something like this.

The issue indicates only towards an employer socially unable to manage trust, competencies and responsability congruently.

Trust cannot be substituted by Tech.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 11:09 pm
UnallocatedClusters
(@unallocatedclusters)
Senior Member

Rolf,

One point is that my friend's company is regulated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") and is thus required to journal all employee communication.

Also, my friend has heard my constant stories regarding my cases involving employee theft of trade secrets, so he has taken steps to prevent such events from occurring.

From my personal experience, many employees do not understand what is their employer's property versus their own.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 11:22 pm
jaclaz
(@jaclaz)
Community Legend

My friend who owns a hedge fund company uses AirWatch http//www.air-watch.com/

All employees are informed that their activities are being monitored upfront.

http//www.air-watch.com/company/privacy-policy/

The information collected and tracked by the AirWatch Console depends upon the system configurations chosen by our Customer. While the following are not required, such information may include, where enabled by the Customer

  • Device identifier and device username
  • Status of the mobile device SIM card
  • MAC addresses and device serial numbers
  • Phone number, signal strength, cell tower, carrier, IMEI#, and other WWAN attributes
  • First and last name and email address of device user
  • Data usage through WWAN interface (excluding content)
  • Transaction history regarding SMS, email and phone calls, excluding the content of messages and calls.
  • Device check-out/check-in tracking who uses which device as well as the physical status of the device at the start of a shift and then again at the end of a shift
  • Tracking of associated device assets, including service plan and associated physical equipment (i.e., cradles, etc.)
  • Tracking of applications loaded on the device (excluding content)
  • Real-time GPS location tracking and mapping, including analysis of location data and history
  • Mobile device remote control, including screen capture.

added just a few bold and red here and there … roll

Missing accessory wink
https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/smart-phone-chained-handcuff-hand-isolated-327098111

jaclaz

ReplyQuote
Posted : 04/02/2017 11:24 pm
RolfGutmann
(@rolfgutmann)
Community Legend

@jaclaz - congrats you reached 3500 posts UTC 194513

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/02/2017 12:45 am
headless
(@headless)
New Member

While I tend to agree with the posts from users saying it is unethical and immoral, a thought popped into my head.

Employees who drive company vehicles are often tracked using GPS. Why do we generally see this as acceptable, but not the same case for mobile devices?

Apologies if this is really off topic!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/02/2017 3:02 am
jaclaz
(@jaclaz)
Community Legend

Employees who drive company vehicles are often tracked using GPS. Why do we generally see this as acceptable, but not the same case for mobile devices?

Because they are at different "levels" of intrusion in an employee's life?

Let's say I am tracking my vehicle that you drive as my employee.
Your timetable is 8 am to 5 pm with one hour break for lunch.
At 5.01 pm you leave the vehicle in the company parking lot and get it next day at 7.59 am.
I can control your movements exclusively within the work time, I can make sure that you are punctual, that you do not arrive late in the morning, that you don't leave the vehicle in the parking lot too early, that the vehicle actually didn't move for 1 hour between 12 and 1 pm which is your lunch time.
Not that much an intrusion in your privacy though a lot of unions may protest about it if the data gathered is used for (say) reducing your salary if you are late or take too much time for lunch.

Now let's imagine that I am tracking my phone that you use as my employee.
Would this phone be switched on at 8 am and switched off at 5 pm?
Or more likely I would expect you to have it on at all times just in case?
Would I (or the evil geek in my IT) check how much time you spend in the bathroom during work time (which already starts being highly debatable) or - just for the fun of it - would I check where you are at - say - 11 pm?
What if - by pure chance - you result staying for over three hours, two times a week at an address that is not yours and is known to be the address on one of your colleagues?
Would this imply that you have a relation with him/her?
Wouldn't this be a serious invasion of your privacy?

jaclaz

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/02/2017 1:33 pm
RolfGutmann
(@rolfgutmann)
Community Legend

Exceptionally I agree on jaclaz's comparison

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/02/2017 2:52 pm
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