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Nirnias
(@nirnias)
New Member

Hi there,

I am currently studying my masters in computer forensics and i have been offered an interview for a graduate position next week in Deloitte's IT Security and Forensics department. I am just trying to prepare for the interview and was wondering if some people with more experience (or whom happen to work in Deloitte) could give me an idea of what to expect during the interview process, like would it be a sit down interview Q&A type thing or would i be given tasks to accomplish to demonstrate my skill.

Do Deloitte follow a particular format of interviewing? I am currently trying to find out who will actually be interviewing me so that i can try and anticipate the questions i will be asked and also to have questions of my own prepared.

Any advice to help me prepare is greatly appreciated.

Quote
Posted : 07/03/2014 7:42 pm
mscotgrove
(@mscotgrove)
Senior Member

I do not know Deloitte (apart from the name).

However, at any interview, be yourself. You have got to suit them, and they have got to suit you.

For homework, try and learn about the company.

Just be yourself.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/03/2014 10:47 pm
twjolson
(@twjolson)
Active Member

And don't say that a MD5 hash is 32 bits long.

True story.

I didn't get the job.

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Posted : 08/03/2014 2:33 am
scuzz
(@scuzz)
Junior Member

The interview process varies depending on the company. I have been through several different interviews over the past two years and have found they tend to follow a pattern

1) A 35-45 minute face to face interview. This will usually be with a director and senior team member, and the purpose is for them to ascertain how well you present yourself both physically and verbally. They may want to determine whether you could represent the company off-site during a collection and talk to the client in a suitable manner. If you're scruffy and have poor verbal communication skills, they may think twice about hiring you. There will be discussion about your background, relevant skills and what you want to achieve at their company. As previously mentioned, research on the company and their activities will prove useful, if you say you wish to branch into E-Discovery and the company do not offer that service then you might be shooting yourself in the foot. The company has to be right for you, and you for it!

2) If you are successful at the first stage interview, you will be invited back for a second stage interview, which is usually more technical based, with questions aimed at determining whether the qualifications you have are worth the paper they're printed on. I have been asked to look through printed Hex dumps and identify the file based on the header, or you may be asked some questions about current legislation that you might expect to encounter in the course of an investigation. For example, CPA 1978, CJA 2003, PACE 1984, CJIA 2008, CPIA 1996 etc…

3) Third stage interviews are for the senior management team to get a feel for you and determine whether you'd fit the dynamic of their company environment. Generally a short 30 minute conversation and discussion about your intentions with the company.

I've also had interviews that consisted of EnCase tasks, written tests and logical assessments.

One thing I cannot stand to hear is the use of "ummm", "eerrrr" or "like" every third or fourth word!! Listen to the question, take a second to think of a concise answer and present it. If you answer a question "well errr I think I'd like do really well like in the company because eerrr I like get on well with like all types of people, ya know!?" it just makes you sound moronic IMHO. People tend to use umm and like as commas in conversation these days.

Best of luck with your interview, let us know how it goes!

Simon

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Posted : 08/03/2014 4:08 pm
armresl
(@armresl)
Community Legend

Hi Simon,

The Um's that you describe are in no way any indication of the level or um failure of a person to possess the knowledge needed for a specific um task.

If I had a $ for every incredible attorney, or GOOD expert witness that used um on a regular basis on the stand, or in conversations. I'd be a billionaire.

Sorry about the um's and comma's

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/03/2014 10:04 pm
scuzz
(@scuzz)
Junior Member

The Um's that you describe are in no way any indication of the level or um failure of a person to possess the knowledge needed for a specific um task.

Indeed they are not, I only referenced it for the purposes of ensuring that Nirnias creates a good impression.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/03/2014 11:20 pm
Nirnias
(@nirnias)
New Member

The Um's that you describe are in no way any indication of the level or um failure of a person to possess the knowledge needed for a specific um task.

Indeed they are not, I only referenced it for the purposes of ensuring that Nirnias creates a good impression.

Which is greatly appreciated thank you. I do not consciously do it, but now that you have mentioned it i will try to be aware of it during the interview. I have been prepping and spend 30 minutes on the phone with Deloitte's HR manager who was good enough to walk me through what to expect.

Tomorrow i am meeting with a contact who worked in their IT department who is going to spend an hour or so going through the interview process with me to best prepare myself. Have got to go buy some new attire also i think.

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Posted : 10/03/2014 12:20 am
jhup
 jhup
(@jhup)
Community Legend

Come to think of it, from court room psychology, the fillers used make the expert witness more human, approachable, "one of us" and possibly more believable from the trier of fact's perspective.

Just a conjecture.

Hi Simon,

The Um's that you describe are in no way any indication of the level or um failure of a person to possess the knowledge needed for a specific um task.

If I had a $ for every incredible attorney, or GOOD expert witness that used um on a regular basis on the stand, or in conversations. I'd be a billionaire.

Sorry about the um's and comma's

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/03/2014 5:05 pm
adithi10
(@adithi10)
New Member

My telephonic interview with EY was today. I had 20 mins competitive and 20 mins technical interview. The questions are as below

1. Introduce yourself
2. why EY
3. How u see yourself in 5 to 10 yrs.
4. How do you align your goals with the vision 2020 of the company
5. which module u liked the most in your computer forensic studies
6, why you liked that module
7.Can you tell a situation when you had to prioritize work.
8.Tell about a situation when you had to work with someone you did not like.
9. What would you do if you encounter the same situation here. How would you solve.
10. what positive qualities your previous manager will tell about you.
11. how do you think u fit into this position.
12.your weakness
13. life cycle of computer forensics
14. what is inner join and left join and in what scenario it is used.
15. how will you create a database with a table havin 11 relation and other table having many1 relation
16. difference between wiping and deleting data
17.difference between traditional n solid state hard disk
18.difference between RAM n virtual memory
19. what is ETL
20.what is EDW
21.when is having clause used and an example
22.what do you liked the most working in your previous company.

There were some more which i don't remember. it was kinda tough for me as its 1st interview in this field. i would know the result by friday. Fingers crossed. )

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Posted : 25/03/2014 6:18 pm
keydet89
(@keydet89)
Community Legend

I am just trying to prepare for the interview…

And that's commendable…and you should definitely prepare.

However, here's something else to consider in your preparation…

I left military service in 1997, and engaged in the out-processing classes…resume writing, interview prep, etc. The first thing I found during the first few minutes of my first interview…and something that has been reinforced with every interview I've ever had…is that the vast majority of people (including HR) never took the same classes I did!

My point is that most hiring managers, HR reps, and interviewers have no idea how to conduct on interview, let alone one focused on a particular skill set.

Some other things I've encountered…

- During an interview at a tech company, the question came up about buffer overflows; as I was explaining what a "buffer overflow" was, when I mentioned "EIP", two of the interviewers got into their own discussion, which went on for about 20 min…during which, I honestly don't think that they would've noticed had I left.

- I've been in interviews where someone would walk into the room for no other reason than they saw someone sitting there, and interrupt the process.

- I interviewed at MicroStrategy several years ago; the interview process was for me to see four people, for an hour each. With each one, the process was 40 min for a brain teaser, followed by 20 min of interaction. The purpose of the brain teaser was to see how well I could "think outside the box" and innovate. All four of the interviewers admitted to using the same puzzle that was used on them during their interview process…so much for innovation.

- I've been to a number of interviews where, after checking in with HR and the hiring manager, I was handed off to folks who had no idea that I would be there, and the first time that they'd seen my resume was while I was standing in their doorway.

- I was once asked during an interview what my "best hack" was. I thought that this was an odd question…in part because I was interviewing for an IR position. Also, the company I was interviewing with was like most companies…they have NDAs with their clients; you'd think that someone would know better than to ask a question that couldn't be answered without violating an NDA.

Again, I'm not suggesting that you don't prepare. What I am suggesting is that you also be prepared for the unexpected. 😉

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Posted : 25/03/2014 11:17 pm
adithi10
(@adithi10)
New Member

Hi,

I have got an interview with a company for a designation I was working earlier as etl developerbefore starting my masters in computer forensic. that company has forensic branch but no openings as of now.

so my question is what would be the best answer to give if they ask why this post when you are studying forensics. I really want to get this job

thanks

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Posted : 04/04/2014 10:59 pm
Nirnias
(@nirnias)
New Member

Thanks for all the replies, iv been knee deep in assignments and exam prep so never got back to thank everyone else for the additional replies.

So thank you all. I did not get the position i wanted, i think this was mostly due to the fact i am a very poor programmer/coder. Though people who work in the department i applied for all said they either do very very little coding or none at all. While i did not get the position, they did offer me an internship in their ERS department so i could gain some practical experience. Which at the end of the day is all i want. I start in July \0/

During my prep work i came across this Glassdoor website which is great for researching how other people got on during an interview process. I left my own feedback there also for anyone prepping for an interview with Deloitte or similar company/position.

http//www.glassdoor.com/Interview/Deloitte-LLP-IT-Security-Analyst-Interview-Questions-EI_IE2763.0,12_KO13,32.htm#empReview_3929167

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/04/2014 10:39 pm
Ankur88
(@ankur88)
New Member

My telephonic interview with EY was today. I had 20 mins competitive and 20 mins technical interview. The questions are as below

1. Introduce yourself
2. why EY
3. How u see yourself in 5 to 10 yrs.
4. How do you align your goals with the vision 2020 of the company
5. which module u liked the most in your computer forensic studies
6, why you liked that module
7.Can you tell a situation when you had to prioritize work.
8.Tell about a situation when you had to work with someone you did not like.
9. What would you do if you encounter the same situation here. How would you solve.
10. what positive qualities your previous manager will tell about you.
11. how do you think u fit into this position.
12.your weakness
13. life cycle of computer forensics
14. what is inner join and left join and in what scenario it is used.
15. how will you create a database with a table havin 11 relation and other table having many1 relation
16. difference between wiping and deleting data
17.difference between traditional n solid state hard disk
18.difference between RAM n virtual memory
19. what is ETL
20.what is EDW
21.when is having clause used and an example
22.what do you liked the most working in your previous company.

There were some more which i don't remember. it was kinda tough for me as its 1st interview in this field. i would know the result by friday. Fingers crossed. )

Hi Adithi10 - Thanks for this. I recently had a telephone interview for E-Discovery position and I am currently waiting for a response. I was asked half of these questions you have mentioned above. I am just wondering if you were called for the final stage interview with EY after this telephone one, and if so what questions did they ask ? and how long was the whole interview ?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/08/2014 8:43 pm
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