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D:\ drive LNK file artifact question  

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jamesvogel
(@jamesvogel)
New Member

I'm conducting a forensic examination on a laptop with a focus on data ex filtration. One method that I typically use to discover files accessed from external drives is to search for LNK files with a D or E drive path. I've identified a number of files accessed from the D\ drive with the following file path

Windows\Users\XXXXXXXX\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations\5f7b5f1e01b83767.automaticDestinations-ms

Interestingly, the only timestamps available are "Target File" timestamps associated with documents. There are no file system timestamps listed. Also, when reviewing USB connection history there is nothing correlating the LNK file artifacts that I've identified with actual USB storage drive connections to the computer. I feel that the LNK files were imported to the computer from somewhere else, but I don't know enough about how the computer processes these files to understand. Can anyone help me out?

Thank you

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Posted : 01/05/2020 3:08 pm
Rich2005
(@rich2005)
Active Member
Em-Belkasoft
(@em-belkasoft)
Junior Member

Your understanding of LNK files might be wrong or you are viewing them the wrong way.

You can read Belkasoft's article on LNK files.

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Posted : 07/05/2020 8:55 pm
mcman
(@mcman)
Active Member

Automaticdestinations locations are for jumplists and you're likely looking at a jumplist shortcut entry (which are basically LNK files). Do some digging for jumplists and you should be able to find what you need. You'll probably want to correlate the dest list entries as well to get a better idea of what is going on. Rich's link is an excellent place to start.

Also, there's no guarantee that you'll get correlating USB activity to go with a LNK file associated to a D volume. What if D isn't USB mass storage device, or USB device at all. You can't just make that assumption based the information you've provided here. Volume letter assignment is dynamic and not specific to external USB devices.

Jamie

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Posted : 08/05/2020 2:09 pm
jamesvogel
(@jamesvogel)
New Member

@mcman

Thanks for the reply. I'll admit I don't fully understand this. I'm working on company issued machines that are all set up the same and restricted by our IT Dept. I've found that when I find D, E, F... volumes, they are likely an external drive, but understand that this won't always be the case.

I accepted employment at a private company and was tasked with digital forensic duties. I have a law enforcement background, not computer science so it is taking me some time to learn the back end of all this. I've taken training from Magnet Forensics and have learned to use their Axiom product well. I guess you could say I'm practicing push button forensics and trying to learn computer fundamentals as I go. Thanks for taking the time to reply.  

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Posted : 22/05/2020 2:53 pm
keydet89
(@keydet89)
Community Legend
Posted by: @jamesvogel

I'm conducting a forensic examination on a laptop with a focus on data ex filtration. One method that I typically use to discover files accessed from external drives is to search for LNK files with a D or E drive path. I've identified a number of files accessed from the D\ drive with the following file path

Windows\Users\XXXXXXXX\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations\5f7b5f1e01b83767.automaticDestinations-ms

Interestingly, the only timestamps available are "Target File" timestamps associated with documents. There are no file system timestamps listed. Also, when reviewing USB connection history there is nothing correlating the LNK file artifacts that I've identified with actual USB storage drive connections to the computer. I feel that the LNK files were imported to the computer from somewhere else, but I don't know enough about how the computer processes these files to understand. Can anyone help me out?

Thank you

What does "there are no file system timestamps listed" mean?

What is this "USB connection history" you refer to?

Automatic JumpLists are created by user interaction with applications via the shell (i.e., Windows Explorer).  As has already been described, Automatic JumpLists are OLE/Structured Storage documents, with all streams (except the DestList stream) consisting of LNK-formatted content.  As such, there are a LOT of timestamps available.

I'm not at all clear as to what you're doing to assess USB device connections on the system, but that may be where the issue lies.  

Also, keep in mind that data _access_ does not necessarily mean data _exfiltration_.

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Posted : 01/06/2020 6:10 pm
jamesvogel
(@jamesvogel)
New Member

@keydet89

First, sorry if I'm not using the correct technical terms, as I said I'm fairly new at this. 

As for the time stamps. The way I understand it; there are timestamps stored within the metadata of a file, relative to the file no matter which machine it's accessed on, called target file timestamps.  There are also additional timestamps of the file relative to the machine, file system timestamps. I have a loose understanding of it, so let me know if I'm wrong.

My reference to USB connection history may be vendor specific. I'm working with Magnet Axiom. Under the Operating System ->USB Devices Artifact category; I'm identifying any storage drives. From their reference material, the source locations for the data are as follows:

SYSTEM/CurrentControlSet/Enum/USBSTOR

SYSTEM/MountedDevices

NTUSER.DAT/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Explorer/MountPoints2

SYSTEM/CurrentControlSet/Enum/USB

ROOT/Windows/Setupapi.log

ROOT/Windows/inf/setupapi.dev.log 

I do understand that a file may be accessed, but not copied or transferred. However, it seems that any files accessed from an external drive are worth reviewing. 

Thanks 

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Posted : 01/06/2020 6:58 pm
keydet89
(@keydet89)
Community Legend

As far as how you're looking for connected device information, there are short comings in the process Axiom uses; it's not up-to-date, nor sufficient.

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows Search\VolumeInfoCache

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\EMDMgmt

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows Portable Devices\Devices

Sometimes, where the information is stored in the Registry depends upon the type of device; just because the device connects via a USB connector doesn't mean that it was a "USB" device.  For example, some devices, such as digital cameras, will show up under:

HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Enum\SWD\WPDBUSENUM

You might also want to check Windows Event Logs:

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-track-down-usb-flash-drive-usage-in-windows-10s-event-viewer/

Also, consider checking the Microsoft-Windows-Partition%4Diagnostic.evtx Event Log, as well.

 

HTH

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Posted : 01/06/2020 7:31 pm
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