Logicube Launches New Compact Forensic Data Capturing Solution

Logicube® Inc. will debut its newest addition to the company’s line of forensic data capturing solutions, the Forensic Quest®, at the TechnoSecurity 2007 Conference and Expo in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina this week. Quest’s design provides users with advanced features such as MD5 authentication, DD imaging and native write-protect. MD5 authentication and DD imaging occur simultaneously at up to 2.0GB/min and the Quest includes localized multi-language user interface…“Its affordable price, along with advanced features typically found on more expensive devices, makes the Forensic Quest an attractive data capturing tool for forensic investigators,” commented Farid Emrani, COO of Logicube.

The Forensic Quest includes SATA/PATA connectivity built-in and a direct to IDE interface. PCMCIA support is available through the optional CloneCardPRO® adapter. CompactFlash®, 2.5” and 1.8” can also be connected with optional adapters available from Logicube. An optional rechargeable battery pack is also available to enable extended use.

Quest includes a one year standard parts and labor warranty and extended one year and two year warranties are available. Logicube will begin shipping the Forensic Quest at the end of July.

About Logicube

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Logicube is the world’s leader in hard drive duplication and eForensics solutions. The company offers a complete line of products from one-to-one and production grade duplicators to sophisticated cell phone and PDA data capturing systems. Founded in 1993, with headquarters in Chatsworth, California Logicube is dedicated to delivering reliable, innovative, state-of-the-art solutions for users worldwide. The company’s products are sold direct to users, through international distributors and authorized dealers world-wide. For more information visit their website at http://www.logicube.com or http://www.logicubeforensics.com.

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