Phill Moore’s Round-Up Of This Month In Forensics

James Habben at 4n6ir explores the SCCM database in two posts, and Mark Mckinnon wrote an Autopsy Plugin to extract the relevant data.

Didier Stevens shows how to extract password history from the ntds.dit file.

Roberto Rodriguez shows how to build a sysmon dashboard on top of ELK.

Darren Freestone has shared his thoughts on the recent SHA1 collision and its impact on digital forensics.

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Paul Sanderson announced a book on SQLite Forensics.

Andrea Lazzarotto has a post on extracting data from damaged NTFS drives.Sarah Edwards shares her research on the Aggregate Dictionary database on iOS.

SANS published Xiaoxi Fan’s whitepaper on detecting system clock modifications on Windows.

Doug White delivers a demonstration about incident response and forensic reporting.

Jonathon Poling lists a range of important points to consider when dealing with engagement scoping.

Lee Whitfield announced he will be accepting 4cast Awards nominations until the 31st March.

Michael Leclair explains what he looks for when deciding whether to attend a conference or not.

Susteen has released a version of their new Cloud Analyzer free to all law enforcement agencies.

Arsenal Consulting released a free version of Hibernation Recon.

Ryan Benson released Hindsight version 2.

Eric Zimmerman updated ShellBags Explorer to version 0.9.0.0

Cellebrite updated their UFED products to version 6.1.

Belkasoft Evidence Center was updated to version 8.3.

X-Ways Forensics was updated to version 19.1 SR-6.

Phill Moore is the curator of This Week In 4n6, a blog which puts together a summary of relevant industry news in digital forensics and incident response.

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Latest Videos

Quantifying Data Volatility for IoT Forensics With Examples From Contiki OS

Forensic Focus 22nd June 2022 5:00 am

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run. 

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems. 

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run.

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems.

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

YouTube Video UCQajlJPesqmyWJDN52AZI4Q_i0zd7HtluzY

A Systematic Approach to Understanding MACB Timestamps on Unixlike Systems

Forensic Focus 21st June 2022 5:00 am

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