VidReport from Sanderson Forensics

VidReport from Sanderson Forensics (www.sandersonforensics.com) is a new forensic tool designed to ease the burden on investigators dealing with either large video files or multiple video files. VidReport allows the investigator to create reports based upon the content of a video; the report can be defined by including one frame in 10, 100 or 1000 (or anything in between) as specified by the investigator. Or, they can chose to use a unique feature of VidReport which compares successive frames and will include the first frame and any frame which differs from the preceding frame by a predefined percentage. When used in this mode the generation of the report can be 50-100 times faster than the viewing of the complete video – on a recent real world job a selection of frames spaced at approximately 10 seconds from four home videos with a total time of 98 minutes took just 90 seconds to create. The report can then be saved (as an HTML file) and produced as part of the evidence…VidReport provides the following functions

· Extract all or a selection of frames as JPG’s

· Select frames at a specified spacing

· Base selected frames on change of frame content

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· Create HTML reports of all or a selection of video frames

· Batch process multiple video files

· Supports most video formats (may require codecs to be installed)

More information can be found on the Sanderson Forensics website at www.sandersonforensics.com

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