81% of British public would be happy for the police to scan their mobile phone

An independent survey amongst 1,000 people in the UK to gauge attitudes about the use of mobile forensic technology shows that the majority of the British public are comfortable with police using the latest forensic technology to help solve crimes. The survey, conducted on behalf of Cellebrite, a provider of mobile forensic solutions to the police and intelligence services, reveals that 81% of respondents would be happy to allow the police to extract mobile data from their phone if they were found in the vicinity of a crime scene and 71% believe that all data extracted in this way should be held by police for a year or more…As further evidence of the relaxed attitude towards policing 56% of respondents support the British system of allowing police to stop and search a suspect if reasonable grounds for suspicion exist, in contrast to the system in practise in other countries like Germany and Holland that requires a judge’s permission to forensically examine digital devices like computers or phones. An additional 27% of respondents believe that the police should have greater powers than they currently possess: just 17% believe the police have too much power.

When questioned specifically about the use of such mobile technology to search the phones of motorists suspected of committing a traffic offence, 77% of Brits believe the police should be entitled to extract mobile data from a phone or satellite navigation device with the driver’s permission. The survey revealed that – not only is the public happy with the use of such technology in traffic offences – but 91% of those who were happy with its use felt the data retrieved should be used to help solve other crimes.

Commenting on the survey findings Cellebrite co-CEO Yossi Carmil said, “We are very pleased to see the public support for the use of mobile forensic technology like our own to help track down and prosecute offenders. Police and intelligence organisations around the world have already embraced the way in which our technology can help deliver immediate information that can prove critical during that important golden hour following a crime being committed. It’s reassuring to see the balanced attitude of the British public in weighing up the need to protect our society against criminals by using the latest available forensic technology and protecting our civil liberties.”
To see the full survey findings, please send your full contact details to: [email protected]
About UFED

The world leader in mobile forensics, Cellebrite is #1 in the market with over 12,000 devices in use by military, law enforcement, governments and intelligence agencies in more than 60 countries worldwide. Its core product, the UFED (Universal Forensic Extraction Device), enables fast data extraction from more than 4,000 devices including smartphones, legacy phones and GPS devices, covering all major mobile OS, including iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Symbian and Palm.

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About Cellebrite
Cellebrite is the leading provider of mobile forensic solutions and mobile data transfer solutions. Established in 1999 by experts in the telecommunications and mobile telephony fields, its technical know-how, vast experience, and leadership in the two related markets of mobile forensics and data transfer, allows Cellebrite to invest more in R&D than any industry player and continuously deliver leading solutions for the mobile industry. Cellebrite is a global company with over 200 employees, known for its technological breakthroughs in the cel*****ar industry. Cellebrite is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Sun Corporation, a listed Japanese company (6736/JQ). For more information, please visit www.cellebrite.com

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