Amped Software launches the Amped FIVE Training Modules

Amped Software has recently launched the Amped FIVE Training Modules. But what are these exactly? Read on to find out more.

The Amped FIVE Training Modules

The Amped FIVE Training Modules are training classes designed specifically for Amped Software end-users to acquire more advanced skills and knowledge within technical areas of video forensics. These modules focus on students’ needs and the evolving requirements of digital forensics, giving them the opportunity to perform tasks with reachable objectives. The module format allows users to develop their skills at a pace they set and also personalize the areas in which they want to specialize.

Learning objectives:

  • Gain greater expertise in Amped FIVE
  • Learn how to improve the presentation of your evidence ready for court
  • Perform height analysis and speed estimation utilizing photogrammetry and measurement filters
  • Get acquainted with video extraction from CCTV and other video storage systems
  • Dive into the latest product updates within Amped FIVE.

All modules have an approximate duration of 12 hours. These hours can be spanned into 2 full days if the course is In-Person or 3 half days if Live Online.

Download the flyer here

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Available Modules

MODULE 1 – VIDEO EVIDENCE PRESENTATION

This is a course designed for people of all skill levels who are called to testify in court or present evidence with a clear and well-established procedure. This module is intended for users who need to use Amped FIVE as a tool to perform annotations, redactions, and presentations in a professional, simple and effective way, maintaining a sound forensic workflow. Students will be able to use the Amped FIVE techniques and filters necessary to perform the best presentation task in the most efficient way. The course will be fully hands-on with practical exercises to present real or simulated cases.

See the schedule

MODULE 2 – MEASUREMENTS AND SPEED ESTIMATION

This is an intermediate-to-expert-level course designed for people who need to perform measurement operations, photogrammetry, and speed analysis for collisions investigations. This module is intended for users who are seeking to use the Amped FIVE Measurement (Measure 1D, Measure 2D, and Measure 3D) and Speed Estimation tool, with all the tools, notions, and procedures that are necessary to improve the analysis precision and accuracy. The course is a mixture of lectures and hands-on with practical exercises to solve real or simulated cases using Amped FIVE.

See the schedule

MODULE 3 – FILE ANALYSIS AND DVR CONVERSION

This is an intermediate-level module focused on the tools and techniques required to perform a forensically sound video extraction from CCTV and other video storage systems using Amped FIVE. This course aims to take a deeper look at the video encoding and decoding process and give the elements of how a forensic acquisition should be operated.

See the schedule

MODULE 4 – AMPED FIVE UPDATES

This is an expert-level course for users previously trained in Amped FIVE and who are seeking to leverage Amped FIVE to improve their investigations. Due to the speed of development at Amped Software, it has been identified that within 12 – 18 months, users may require an update to their training. This is a course that allows users to better understand the newly released filters and functionalities within Amped FIVE to ensure the correct interpretation of data and learn how to use the new tools to their full advantage. The course is a mixture of lectures and hands-on with practical exercises to solve real or simulated cases using Amped FIVE.

See the schedule

Book a seat today or contact Amped Software for more information.

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File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run. 

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems. 

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

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Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run.

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems.

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

YouTube Video UCQajlJPesqmyWJDN52AZI4Q_i0zd7HtluzY

A Systematic Approach to Understanding MACB Timestamps on Unixlike Systems

Forensic Focus 21st June 2022 5:00 am

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