Forensic Toolkit® 3.0 Preview at HTCIA International

AccessData has announced the preview of Forensic Toolkit® 3.0 (FTK®) which will be demonstrated at HTCIA International on August 24th in Lake Tahoe, California. Below are just a few highlights of the FTK 3.0 release…Reengineered for Improved Performance:

* UI Performance: The FTK GUI is 10 times more responsive across the board, even on machines with only 4GB of RAM.
* Indexing: Indexes quickly and search results populate fast, even with large result sets.
* Distributed Processing: Every copy of FTK 3 comes with 4 workers, allowing you to leverage CPU resources from up to 4 computers (3 distributed workers and 1 worker on the main FTK examiner system).

Compelling New Capabilities:

* RAM Analysis: Enumerate all running processes from 32-bit machines, search memory strings, and process RAM captures for passwords, html pages, lnk files and MS Office documents.
* Mac Analysis: Many new capabilities, such as processing B-Trees attributes for metadata, decrypting Sparse Images or Sparse Bundles, PLIST support, SQLite support and more.
* Pornographic Image Identification: Enables the automated detection and identification of pornographic images by analyzing visual features in the image to assess its actual visual content.

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About AccessData

AccessData has pioneered digital investigations for twenty years, providing the technology and training that empower law enforcement, government agencies and corporations to perform computer investigations of any kind with speed and efficiency. Recognized throughout the world as an industry leader, AccessData delivers state-of-the-art computer forensic, network forensic, password cracking and decryption solutions. AccessData’s Forensic Toolkit® and enterprise investigative solutions enable examiners to search for, analyze and forensically preserve electronic evidence for the purposes of criminal investigations, internal investigations, incident response and eDiscovery. AccessData is also a leading provider of digital forensics training and certification with its much sought after AccessData Certified Examiners (ACE) program. For more information on AccessData visit www.accessdata.com.

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Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems.

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

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Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

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Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

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