MANDIANT Releases First Response v.1.1.1

MANDIANT has announced that it has upgraded its free MANDIANT First Response (MFR) software in response to an advisory from researchers at Symantec’s Vulnerability Research program. MANDIANT responded quickly to upgrade the MFR tool to protect against a Denial of Service (DoS) and session hijacking issue associated with the MFR Agent software…“MANDIANT remains dedicated to the improvement of its free software and recognizes the importance of public disclosure,” said Dave Merkel, Vice President of Products for MANDIANT. “We would like to thank Symantec for discovering and notifying us of these potential vulnerabilities.”

“MANDIANT has notified its registered users of the need to upgrade to version 1.1.1 and encourages all users of MFR to upgrade as soon as possible,” added Mr. Merkel.

The upgraded version of MANDIANT First Response is available at www.mandiant.com/firstresponse.htm.

A full copy of the Symantec advisory is available at http://www.symantec.com/enterprise/research/.

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About MANDIANT First Response

First Response is Incident Response management software intended for information security staff, investigators and forensic professionals that respond to computer security incidents. MANDIANT recognizes the importance of investigating any potential computer security incident, and created MANDIANT First Response to foster diligent, effective and efficient response to these incidents.

MANDIANT First Response provides the ability to remotely collect the volatile data that allows organizations to perform precision strike responses when an incident occurs. Information from file listings, system registries, running processes and services, event logs, and many other data sources can now be centrally gathered and rapidly reviewed to validate a computer security event. Additionally, MANDIANT First Response provides analysts with rapid report generation and data export features, streamlining coordination between incident responders. The intended users of the software are information security staff, investigators and forensic professionals.

The software is comprised of a deployable agent that gathers relevant forensic data from target systems and a centralized console for command, control, and analysis functions. Data acquisitions can be performed locally or via a network connection, providing investigators with the necessary flexibility to conduct forensic operations in a variety of environments. MANDIANT First Response is available for Windows 2000, 2003, and XP systems.

MANDIANT First Response was named a finalist by SC Magazine in their 2007 SC Magazine Awards – Best Computer Forensics Solutions category.

MANDIANT is an information security company with offices in the Washington, DC area and New York City. We provide professional services, education and software for major corporations, government agencies, financial institutions and law firms. With extensive experience in the military, intelligence, law enforcement and the private sector, MANDIANT’s security consultants are specialists in incident response, computer forensics, network security, application security, and education. To learn more about MANDIANT, please visit www.mandiant.com.

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