Nuix appoints Paul Slater as Global Head of Investigations

Global technology company Nuix today named Paul Slater as its Global Head of Investigations. In his new role, Slater will work with key stakeholders across Nuix, customers and the broader marketplace to provide strategic direction to Nuix’s digital forensic investigation business line.“Paul has been our go-to resource for investigations expertise since he joined the company and I’m delighted that he has agreed to concentrate on growing our credentials in this area,” said Eddie Sheehy, CEO of Nuix. “Paul’s expertise will help us increase our capacity to deal with petabyte-scale investigations driven by intelligence-style workflows.”

Slater will lead many of Nuix’s activities around law enforcement and policing, government, and enterprise investigations. He will further contribute to the development of Nuix Investigation & Response and its integration with Elasticsearch as a database back end.

Slater previously was Executive Director of EMEA and Director of Forensic Solutions at Nuix. Before joining the company in 2013, Slater worked for more than 20 years as a police officer and consultant in investigations, digital forensics and eDiscovery, including as interim head of the digital forensics unit in the UK Serious Fraud Office.

“Investigations have changed drastically over the past few years with the explosion in volume and variety of evidence,” said Slater. “Investigators need new and deeper expertise to manage their workloads, reduce case backlogs and answer questions of digital evidence for more stakeholders than ever before. I look forward to continue working with Nuix to make a lasting impact on the way organisations approach investigations today, tomorrow and in years to come.”

Get The Latest DFIR News!

Top DFIR articles in your inbox every month.


Unsubscribe any time. We respect your privacy - read our privacy policy.

About Nuix
Nuix (www.nuix.com) protects, informs and empowers society in the knowledge age. Leading organisations around the world turn to Nuix when they need fast, accurate answers for investigation, cybersecurity incident response, insider threats, litigation, regulation, privacy, risk management and other essential challenges.

###

Nuix Technology UK Ltd
Beaufort House, 11th Floor
15 St Botolph Street
London EC3A 7BB
United Kingdom

Leave a Comment

Latest Videos

Quantifying Data Volatility for IoT Forensics With Examples From Contiki OS

Forensic Focus 22nd June 2022 5:00 am

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run. 

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems. 

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run.

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems.

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

YouTube Video UCQajlJPesqmyWJDN52AZI4Q_i0zd7HtluzY

A Systematic Approach to Understanding MACB Timestamps on Unixlike Systems

Forensic Focus 21st June 2022 5:00 am

This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Important: No API Key Entered.

Many features are not available without adding an API Key. Please go to the YouTube Feed settings page to add an API key after following these instructions.

Latest Articles

Share to...