Solera Networks Partners with EMC

Solera Networks has announced its partnership with EMC Corporation. The companies’ technologies will create a network forensics storage solution to meet the growing needs of Fortune 1000 companies and government institutions…Today’s threats target enterprise and government networks using tactics that are achieving a new level of sophistication and will remain undetectable by current signature-based security tools. Operation Aurora that targeted Google(TM) and other prominent organizations, and recent ZeuS botnet variants, are recent examples of these threats. Network forensics products like Solera Networks are the only solution to defend against unidentified, persistent threats to the network. Enterprises need the ability to store data in a single scalable location, with redundancy built in, without sacrificing instant access to that data. There has been a barrier to providing these critical elements and maintaining lossless capture on today’s high-speed networks.

The Solera DS SAN solution, powered by EMC, breaks the single-system storage barrier by providing incident responders instant assess to the full detail of historical network activity in up to one petabyte of captured network data. Unlike competitive solutions, which require the use of multiple standalone systems to scale to the needs of modern networks, DS SAN simplifies and consolidates hardware deployments while reducing management costs. DS SAN is available immediately in configurations starting at 100 TB of capture storage for network speeds ranging from 100 Mbps through 10 Gbps.

“EMC is the industry leader for enterprise storage solutions,” said Steve Shillingford, CEO of Solera Networks. “As we are becoming the most recommended and requested network forensics solution for large enterprise and government, customers are asking for even larger windows of captured network traffic and the ability to sift through terabytes of data for specific details of any security event. Combined with EMC, we deliver a network surveillance platform for effective incident response that can scale to the needs of any organization.”

A key component of Solera Networks technology is Solera DSFS(TM), the groundbreaking custom-built file system designed to achieve 10 Gbps network capture while offering instant access to any packet of information that has traversed the network. Combined with EMC storage solutions, Solera DS SAN breaks the high-speed capture barrier that other technologies are unable able to overcome.

Get The Latest DFIR News!

Top DFIR articles in your inbox every month.


Unsubscribe any time. We respect your privacy - read our privacy policy.

About Solera Networks
Solera Networks develops a high-speed network surveillance and forensics platform for complete capture, indexing, storage, retrieval, and reconstruction of any network event. Our systems capture every packet at line rates up to 10Gbps on physical and virtual networks. The Solera Networks architecture provides open platform interoperability, extensible storage, and portability for any network, giving security professionals comprehensive network visibility. For more information on Solera Networks, visit http://www.soleranetworks.com.
SOURCE: Solera Networks

Solera Networks
Alan Hall, 801-545-4060
[email protected]
or
Strategic Communications Group
Shany Seawright, 240-485-1081
[email protected]

Leave a Comment

Latest Videos

Quantifying Data Volatility for IoT Forensics With Examples From Contiki OS

Forensic Focus 22nd June 2022 5:00 am

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run. 

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems. 

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

File timestamps are used by forensics practitioners as a fundamental artifact. For example, the creation of user files can show traces of user activity, while system files, like configuration and log files, typically reveal when a program was run.

Despite timestamps being ubiquitous, the understanding of their exact meaning is mostly overlooked in favor of fully-automated, correlation-based approaches. Existing work for practitioners aims at understanding Windows and is not directly applicable to Unix-like systems.

In this paper, we review how each layer of the software stack (kernel, file system, libraries, application) influences MACB timestamps on Unix systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, FreeBSD and macOS.

We examine how POSIX specifies the timestamp behavior and propose a framework for automatically profiling OS kernels, user mode libraries and applications, including compliance checks against POSIX.

Our implementation covers four different operating systems, the GIO and Qt library, as well as several user mode applications and is released as open-source.

Based on 187 compliance tests and automated profiling covering common file operations, we found multiple unexpected and non-compliant behaviors, both on common operations and in edge cases.

Furthermore, we provide tables summarizing timestamp behavior aimed to be used by practitioners as a quick-reference.

Learn more: https://dfrws.org/presentation/a-systematic-approach-to-understanding-macb-timestamps-on-unixlike-systems/

YouTube Video UCQajlJPesqmyWJDN52AZI4Q_i0zd7HtluzY

A Systematic Approach to Understanding MACB Timestamps on Unixlike Systems

Forensic Focus 21st June 2022 5:00 am

This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Important: No API Key Entered.

Many features are not available without adding an API Key. Please go to the YouTube Feed settings page to add an API key after following these instructions.

Latest Articles

Share to...