Manchester based CY4OR take on the nation’s cyber criminals

Business is booming for Computer Forensic Company CY4OR as they expand to meet with the weighty national demand to investigate computer crime. The company is the brain child of computer enthusiast Joel Tobias whose intuitive anticipation of the growth in this market has led to the team tripling in size since its creation in 2002. “Computer Crime is a growing problem that needs to be addressed by UK companies of all sizes” says Tobias “A staggering 89% of businesses have experienced an incident of computer related crime in the past year, with the majority of these being committed internally by disgruntled or dishonest staff.”The firm’s new state of the art office in Bury is the latest addition to a string of offices nationwide. The day to day handling of sensitive and criminal evidence from seized computers has meant blast proof storage rooms, barred windows and security checks from Scotland Yard are standard – but it’s all in a days work for the team.

The firm receive work from a range of clients; from Financial Directors looking to investigate unscrupulous finance departments through to national police forces including the High Tech Crime Unit, dealing with serious criminal investigations.

“Working on behalf of national Law Enforcement agencies means we have a responsibility to have on board staff that are the best in their field” says Tobias who has recently won a tender to serve the Metropolitan Police for
the next 3 yrs in addition to working on behalf of the Hampshire Police
force.

In recognition of their services to the Legal Community, CY4OR have been short listed for the Litigation Support Service Provider of the Year Award 2006 in association with Legal Business Magazine, and the team are thrilled with this recognition of their work.

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CY4OR’s credentials are impressive; every forensic analyst at the firm is trained to EnCase level (this industry’s quality standard mark), making them arguably the most qualified team in the business.

The line up also includes Keith Cottenden, who having spent 22yrs in the RAF specialising in counter intelligence now heads up the forensic team.

The fast growing demand for their services has led to further recruitment in 2005; Jason Joy joins the management team from Experian as Marketing & Communications Manager, and Chris Marks formerly an ISAS Consultant at accounts firm Ernst Young is a now a valued forensic analyst.

It is an exciting time for CY4OR as they go from strength to strength and envisage further growth in their Aylesbury and Covent Garden offices during 2006.

Carrie Moss
[email protected]
www.CY4OR.co.uk
0161 797 8123

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