Exterro Law Enforcement Grant Program Announces 2021 Recipients

Five Law Enforcement Agencies to Receive Exterro FTK® Software Package and Training

PORTLAND, Ore., February 1, 2022 — Exterro Inc., the preferred provider of Legal GRC software specifically designed for in-house legal, privacy, and IT teams at Global 2000 and AmLaw 200 organizations, today proudly announced the first five recipients of grants from the Exterro Law Enforcement Grant Program. These deserving law enforcement agencies will receive software and training packages valued at several thousand dollars, including a one-year subscription to the FTK digital forensic toolkit software suite and Exterro Forensics Training Pass for unlimited training for one year.

Law enforcement agencies have relied on FTK technology for over three decades, using it to bring criminals to justice and stop terrorism, human trafficking, child exploitation, cybercrime and other crimes. Now that FTK is part of the Exterro technology suite, Exterro created this grant program to demonstrate its continuing commitment to the law enforcement professionals who serve our communities.

Out of many deserving applicants, the following five law enforcement agencies will receive grants:

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  • Liberty Police Department, Liberty, NC
  • Shelby Township Police, Shelby Township, MI
  • Lake Havasu City Police Department, Topock, AZ
  • Scott County Sheriff’s Office, Davenport, IA
  • Venice Police Department, Venice, FL

These agencies, like many others, face budgeting challenges that limit their ability to process digital evidence. As one grant recipient explained, “Our budget is extremely restricted; this year we will likely be unable to replace several aging vehicles that are barely being kept functional. We do not have the ability in-house to process any kind of digital evidence and must outsource all processing of this type of evidence. This is expensive, time-consuming, and has significantly hindered us in numerous investigations.”

Exterro Vice President of Sales Trey Tramonte helped spearhead the launch of the grant program, “We are very excited to kick off Exterro’s Law Enforcement Grant Program, which was originally initiated by AccessData in 2008. Our goal is to help law enforcement agencies gain access to the technology they need in order to work their cases and bring criminals to justice in a timely manner. Too many agencies are still reliant on sending their data out to the FBI’s Regional Computer Forensics Laboratories or other state agencies’ forensics labs, which have backlogs exceeding 12 months in many instances.”

Exterro’s Law Enforcement Grant Program awards five grant recipients twice per calendar year. To learn more about the program or to apply for grants, visit its homepage on Exterro.com.

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