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Reviews

Reviews

2014


2014

Guidance Software EnCase Training Computer Forensics I

Reviewed by Scar de Courcier, Forensic Focus

During the first week of December 2014, Guidance Software ran a computer forensics training course at its Slough offices in the UK, with the aim of helping forensic practitioners to understand and use EnCase as part of their investigations.

Background

The course was developed by Guidance Software with a view to introducing new digital forensics practitioners to the field. The students are usually new IT security professionals, law enforcement agents and forensic investigators, and many have minimal training in computing.

Computer Forensics I is available both in person at one of Guidance Software's training centres, or online via their OnDemand solution, which provides live remote classes for students around the world.   more ...

2014

Magnet Forensics IEF Essentials Training

Reviewed by Scar de Courcier, Forensic Focus

On the 14th-17th of October 2014, Magnet Forensics ran its first remote training course on the essential knowledge required to properly use Internet Evidence Finder, Magnet's flagship software solution.

The course was set up with the aim of aiding digital forensics investigators who are completely new to IEF, or investigators who are not used to working with digital forensics solutions but require their use on certain cases.

Background

Rob Maddox, Magnet's Director of Global Training, put the course together and described how it was developed:   more ...

2014

Oxygen Forensic Suite 2014

Reviewed by Mark Rigby, Faraday Forensics Ltd

Oxygen Forensic Suite 2014 is specialist software aimed squarely at mobile phone forensics. It claims to have the “widest range of supported devices” with over 8,400 models listed and is geared towards smart-phones with a particular emphasis on the analysis of data recovered from them.

It is straightforward to use once you get your head around the way it works, and with some thought you can make it fit into your examination system quite easily. You don’t have to be particularly savvy to use it, but you do to get the most out of it and be able to use it effectively.

There are several license types, such as “Internet” (software key), USB dongle (individual machine) and an enterprise version whereby a single USB dongle is installed on a server and allows several machines to use the software at the same time.   more ...

2013


2013

Internet Evidence Finder (IEF)

Magnet Forensics, developer of IEF
Reviewed by BitHead (discussion thread here).

When this review started at the beginning of August 2012, Internet Evidence Finder (IEF) was a project of Jad Saliba of JADSoftware. At that time the version was 5.41.

The interface was simple, and IEF was an easy to use tool that found a lot of artifacts and displayed them in an easy to follow report.

In the middle of August I was contacted by Adam Belsher of JADSoftware and told there was going to be a few major changes coming to JADSoftware. A week later Saliba announced “JADsoftware has a new identity, including a new company name – Magnet Forensics.”   more ...

2011


2011

Scott Moulton’s “5-Day Data Recovery Expert Certification” Course

Scott Moulton
Reviewed by by Karlo Arozqueta.

http://www.myharddrivedied.com/data-recovery-training

Just about every individual who is immersed in the Information Technology field has either personally experienced it, or knows someone who has: The hard drive “click of death”. For most, this sound is the start of a downward spiral of doom and depression and eventually a large bill from a data recovery company. For some, however, this is the beginning of a new field of interest in technology. There is only one problem: The field of hard drive data recovery is one that is still shrouded in secrecy and misinformation. How can someone break into an industry where advice is doled out in hushed tones and newcomers are shunned and told to seek professional (read:$$$) help?   more ...